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A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States Image
A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States
Author: Compiled and Edited by Norman Drachler
All Our Yesterdays: A Brief History of Detroit Image
All Our Yesterdays: A Brief History of Detroit
Author: Frank B. Woodford and Arthur M. Woodford
Detroit to Fort Sackville, 1778-1779: The Journal of Normand MacLeod Image
Detroit to Fort Sackville, 1778-1779: The Journal of Normand MacLeod
Author: Normand MacLeod, Edited by William A. Evans and Elizabeth Sklar
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor Image
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor
Author: June Kompass Nelson
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives from Israel Image
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives from Israel
Author: Haya Bar-Itzhak and Aliza Shenhar
Medieval Jewish Seals from Europe Image
Medieval Jewish Seals from Europe
Author: Daniel M. Friedenberg
On Jewish Folklore Image
On Jewish Folklore
Author: Raphael Patai
Queen of the Lakes Image
Queen of the Lakes
Author: Mark L. Thompson
The Iron Hunter Image
The Iron Hunter
Author: Chase S. Osborn
Toast of the Town: The Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson Image
Toast of the Town: The Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson
Author: Sunnie Wilson with John Cohassey
Twenty Israeli Composers Image
Twenty Israeli Composers
Author: Robert Fleisher
Working Detroit Image
Working Detroit
Author: Steve Babson with Ron Alpern, Dave Elsila, and John Revitte
A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States
A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States Image

This book contains entries from thousands of publications whether in English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and German—books, research reports, educational and general periodicals, synagogue histories, conference proceedings, bibliographies, and encyclopedias—on all aspects of Jewish education from pre-school through secondary education.

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Author: Compiled and Edited by Norman Drachler
All Our Yesterdays: A Brief History of Detroit
All Our Yesterdays: A Brief History of Detroit Image

All Our Yesterdays is an accurate account based on extensive historical research when initially published in 1969, and is written in such a style as to make interesting and historical snapshot of the history of the city of Detroit.

The authors recount the founding of the town by the French, control by the British, and growth as an American city. These episodes are recounted in the words and deeds of the people who lived and worked here, men like Judge Woodward, Father Gabriel Richard, and Governor Lewis Cass. The reader meets, among others, old General Hull surrendering the city to the British General Brock, dread cholera epidemics killing hundreds of residents, a man named Vernor making up a batch of excellent ginger ale to sell in his drug store, and Charles King building and driving the city’s first motor car. Here are also accounts of the expansion of the automobile industry, the days of the Roaring Twenties, Prohibition, Great Depression, World Wars I and II, and the city of the 1950s and 1960s. This is the story of a great city; a story of past deeds, present problems, and future hopes. But more important, this is a story by and about the people of Detroit, for it is the people that have made this city great.

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Author: Frank B. Woodford and Arthur M. Woodford
All-American Anarchist: Joseph A. Labadie and the Labor Movement
All-American Anarchist: Joseph A. Labadie and the Labor Movement Image

All-American Anarchist chronicles the life and work of Joseph A. Labadie (1850-1933), Detroit’s prominent labor organizer and one of early labor’s most influential activists. A dynamic participant in the major social reform movements of the Gilded Age, Labadie was a central figure in the pervasive struggle for a new social order as the American Midwest underwent rapid industrialization at the end of the nineteenth century.

This engaging biography follows Labadie’s colorful career from a childhood among a Pottawatomie tribe in the Michigan woods through his local and national involvement in a maze of late nineteenth-century labor and reform activities, including participation in the Socialist Labor party, Knights of Labor, Greenback movement, trades councils, typographical union, eight-hour-day campaigns, and the rise of the American Federation of Labor.

Although he received almost no formal education, Labadie was a critical thinker and writer, contributing a column titled “Cranky Notions” to Benjamin Tucker’s Liberty, the most important journal of American anarchism. He interacted with such influential rebels and reformers as Eugene V. Debs, Emma Goldman, Henry George, Samuel Gompers, and Terence V. Powderly, and was also a poet of both protest and sentiment, composing more than five hundred poems between 1900 and 1920.

Affectionately known as Detroit’s “Gentle Anarchist,” Labadie’s flamboyant and amiable personality counteracted his caustic writings, making him one of the city’s most popular figures throughout his long life despite his dissident ideals. His individualistic anarchist philosophy was also balanced by his conventional personal life – he was married to a devout Catholic and even worked for the city’s water commission to make ends meet.

In writing this biography of her grandfather, Carlotta R. Anderson consulted the renowned Labadie Collection at the University of Michigan, a unique collection of protest literature which extensively documents pivotal times in American labor history and radical history. She also had available a large collection of family scrapbooks, letters, photographs, and Labadie’s personal account book. Including passages from Labadie’s vast writings, poems, and letters, All-American Anarchist traces America’s recurring anti-anarchist and anti-radical frenzy and repression, from the 1886 Haymarket bombing backlash to the Red Scares of the twentieth century.

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Author: Carlotta R. Anderson
Ambiguous Relations: The American Jewish Community and Germany Since 1945
Ambiguous Relations: The American Jewish Community and Germany Since 1945 Image

The reemergence of a united Germany as a dominant power in Europe has increased even more it’s importance as a major political ally and trade partner of the United States, despite the misgivings of some U.S. citizens. Ambiguous Relations addresses for the first time the complex relationships between American Jews and Germany over the fifty years following the end of World War II, and examines American Jewry’s’ ambiguous attitude toward Germany that continues despite sociological and generational changes within the community.

Shlomo Shafir recounts attempts by American Jews to influence U.S. policy toward Germany after the ware and traces these efforts through President Reagan’s infamous visit to Bitburg and beyond. He shows how Jewish demands for justice were hampered not only by America’s changing attitude toward West Germany as a postwar European power but also by the distraction of anti-communist hysteria in this country.

In evaluating the impact of Jewish pressure on American public opinion and on the West German government, Shafir discusses the rationales and strategies of Jewish communal and religious groups, legislators, and intellectuals, as well as the rise of Holocaust consciousness and the roles of Israel and surviving German Jewish communities. He also describes the efforts of German diplomats to assuage American Jewish hostility and relates how the American Jewish community has been able to influence German soul-searching regarding their historical responsibility and even successfully intervened to bring war criminals to trial.

Based on extensive archival research in Germany, Israel, and the Unities States, Ambiguous Relations in the first book to examine this tenuous situation in such depth. It is a comprehensive account of recent history that comes to groups with emotional and political reality.

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Author: Shlomo Shafir
American Aliya: Portrait of an Innovative Migration Movement
American Aliya: Portrait of an Innovative Migration Movement Image

 

The major focus is on the who, when, and where of American immigration to Israel, but it is the “why” of this aliya which constitutes the core of the book.  Waxman analyzes the relationship between Zionism, aliya, and the Jewish experience.  Chapters include “Zion in Jewish culture,” a synopsis of Zionism through the years, and “American Jewry and the land of Israel in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries,” an account of proto-Zionist ideas and movements in early America.

Chaim I. Waxman delivers a broad analysis of the phenomenon of American migration to Israel – aliya.  Working within the context of the sociology of migration, Waxman provides primary research into a variety of dimensions of this movement and demonstrates the inadequacy of current migration theories to characterize aliya.

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Author: Chaim I. Waxman
American Jewry and the Holocaust: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945
American Jewry and the Holocaust: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945 Image

In this volume Yehudi Bauer describes the efforts made to aid European victims of World War II by the New York-based American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, American Jewry’s chief representative abroad. Drawing on the mass of unpublished material in the JDC archives and other repositories, as well as on his thorough knowledge of recent and continuing research into the Holocaust, he focuses alternately on the personalities and institutional decisions in New York and their effects on the JDC workers and their rescue efforts in Europe. He balances personal stories with a country-by-country account of the fate of Jews through ought the war years: the grim statistics of millions deported and killed are set in the context of the hopes and frustrations of the heroic individuals and small groups who actively worked to prevent the Nazis’ Final Solution.

This study is essential reading for anyone who seeks to understand the American Jewish response to European events from 1939 to 1945. Bauer confronts the tremendous moral and historical questions arising from JDC’s activities. How great was the danger? Who should be saved first? Was it justified to use illegal or extralegal means? What country would accept Jewish refugees? His analysis also raises an issue which perhaps can never be answered: could American Jews have done more if they had grasped the reality of the Holocaust?

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Author: Yehuda Bauer
Anti-Semitic Stereotypes without Jews: Images of the Jews in England 1290-1700
Anti-Semitic Stereotypes without Jews: Images of the Jews in England 1290-1700 Image

Anti-Semitic Stereotypes Without Jews offers an exploration of English history, 1290- 1700, tracing the growth and development of these attitudes. It demonstrates that it is possible for prejudice to thrive even in the absence of a scapegoat group.

Following the expulsion in the year 1290 until 1656, although there was no real Jewish community in England, the molders of public opinion kept a shadowy image of the Jew alive through sermons and religious tracts, travelogues, folklore, religious and secular drama. In his analysis, Dr. Glassman shows that despite their theological differences, Anglican, Puritan, and Catholic clergymen concurred in the negative images of Jews presented to their congregations. They pictured the Jews as Christ-killers, and related myths of how Jews performed barbaric and sacrilegious rituals. The image was to plague Anglo-Jewry after a small community was reestablished in the second half of the 17th century.

The author’s belief that anti-Semitism is primarily a Christian problem transcends both time and place is covered by this volume. Anti-Semitic sentiments are seen here as reflecting deep-seated, irrational responses to the Jewish people, rooted in the teachings of the church and exploited by men who needed an outlet for religious, social, and economic frustrations.

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Author: Bernard Glassman
Constructing Modern Identities: Jewish University Students in Germany, 1815-1914
Constructing Modern Identities: Jewish University Students in Germany, 1815-1914 Image

The emergence of Jewish student associations in 1881 provided a forum for Jews to openly proclaim their religious heritage. By examining the lives and social dynamics of Jewish university students, Keith Pickus shows how German Jews rearranged their self-images and redefined what it meant to be Jewish. Not only did the identities crafted by these students enable them to actively participate in German society, they also left an indelible imprint on contemporary Jewish culture. Pickus’s portrayal of the mutability and social function of Jewish self-definition challenges previous scholarship that depicts Jewish identity as a static ideological phenomenon. By illuminating how identities fluctuated throughout life, he demonstrates that adjusting one’s social relationships to accommodate the Gentile and Jewish worlds became the norm rather than the exception for 19th-century German Jews.

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Author: Keith H. Pickus
Detroit on Stage: The Players Club, 1910-2005
Detroit on Stage: The Players Club, 1910-2005 Image

Founded in 1910, Detroit’s Players Club is an all-male club devoted to the production of theater by members for other members’ enjoyment. Called simply “The Players,” members of the club design, direct, and act in the shows, including playing the female roles. In Detroit on Stage, Marijean Levering takes readers behind the scenes of the club’s private “frolics” to explore the unique history of The Players, discover what traditions they still hold dear, and examine why they have survived relatively unscathed through changes that have shuttered older and more venerable institutions.

The Players developed during a nationwide vogue for community and art theater and also as Detroit’s auto elites were in the midst of forming new private clubs to add to their own sense of prestige. By the 1920s, The Players had built their own playhouse and established most of their significant traditions, including the monthly frolics, at which the members perform for each other. At the frolics, members in the audience would wear tuxedos and drink beer out of personalized mugs, customs that remain to this day. Prominent Detroiters have always been among the ranks of the Players, and several well-known auto industry figures were members from the beginning, including banker Henry B. Joy, Oldsmobile sales manager Roy D. Chapin, and Ford executives James Couzens and Edsel Ford. Over the decades that followed the club’s founding, its membership and traditions have remained strong despite major world events that shook Detroit such as Prohibition, the Great Depression, and World War II. In looking at The Players of today, Levering explores the camaraderie and sense of history that has kept the club together and relatively unchanged throughout the years. She also examines the club’s notable members and its unique place in Detroit history.

Detroit on Stage places The Players club in the broader contexts of social clubs, explaining how these organizations originate and function. Readers interested in Detroit cultural history and theater studies will enjoy this rare glimpse inside a long-standing Detroit cultural institution.

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Author: Marijean Levering
Detroit to Fort Sackville, 1778-1779: The Journal of Normand MacLeod
Detroit to Fort Sackville, 1778-1779: The Journal of Normand MacLeod Image

In 1777 Normand MacLeod, a British army officer, assumed the post of town major of Detroit, then a British colony on the frontier of late eighteenth-century America. Although it was not in the forefront of action in the American Revolution, the fort at Detroit had an important role because its strategic location made it a point of interest to military leaders on both sides.

Under the leadership of Captain Normand MacLeod, the city of Detroit played a role in the War for Independence that is described in detail in this journal. During the bitter winter of 1778-79, MacLeod led a party of Detroit Volunteer Militia in advance of Henry Hamilton’s main force. Hamilton was attempting to hold Fort Sackville (modern Vincennes, Indiana) against George Rogers Clark and his troops. MacLeod was a shrewd and witty reporter. His diary, published for the first time in this volume, details the daily routine of the arduous midwinter military campaign. He describes daily life within the walls of the fort at Detroit, the military adventures planned within those walls, and the rumors, the gossip, and the personal relationships within the community.

Offering an unprecedented personal glimpse of Detroit life in the years 1778-79, the diary preserves the flavor of one bitter winter of the American Revolution of special significance for historians of Michigan and Detroit. William A. Evans’s introduction to the journal places MacLeod’s expedition in the context of Hamilton’s strategy and provides a biographical account of MacLeod himself that has not been available previously.

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Author: Normand MacLeod, Edited by William A. Evans and Elizabeth Sklar
Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968
Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968 Image

Although historians have devoted a great deal of attention to the development of federal government policy regarding civil rights in the quarter century following World War II, little attention has been paid to the equally important developments at the state level. Few states underwent a more dramatic transformation with regard to civil rights than Michigan did. In 1948, the Michigan Committee on Civil Rights characterized the state of civil rights in Michigan as presenting “an ugly picture.” Twenty years later, Michigan was a leader among the states in civil rights legislation. “Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights” documents this important shift in state level policy and makes clear that civil rights in Michigan embraced not only blacks but women, the elderly, native Americans, migrant workers, and the physically handicapped.

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Author: Sidney Fine
For Our Soul: Ethiopian Jews in Israel
For Our Soul: Ethiopian Jews in Israel Image

Between 1977 and 1992, practically all Ethiopian Jews migrated to Israel. This mass move followed the 1974 revolution in Ethiopia and its ensuing economic and political upheavals, compounded by the brutality of the military regime and the willingness—after years of refusal—of the Israeli government to receive them as bona fide Jews entitled to immigrate to that country. As the sole Jewish community from sub-Sahara Africa in Israel, the Ethiopian Jews have met with unique difficulties. Based on fieldwork conducted over several years, For Our Soul describes the ongoing process of adjustment and absorption that the Ethiopian Jewish immigrants, also known as Falasha or Beta Israel, experienced in Israel.

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Author: Teshome G. Wagaw
From East to West: The Westward Migration of Jews from Eastern Europe During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
From East to West: The Westward Migration of Jews from Eastern Europe During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Image

Migration has been a major factor in the life of the Jewish people throughout the two and a half millennia of their dispersion. And yet, the history of the Jewish migratory movements has not been fully explored in Jewish history. While the Jewish migratory movements in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and especially immigration to the New World, have attracted the attention of scholars, earlier such movements did not. In the present book I propose to discuss such a movement of an earlier period, that from Eastern Europe to the countries of the West, from its inception at the beginning of the seventeenth century to the dissolution of the old Polish commonwealth.  Since this book deals with the history of a Jewish migratory movement, it should be understood that unless otherwise indicated, the terms emigrants, immigrants, and migrants refer to Jews.

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Author: Moses A. Shulvass
From New Zion to Old Zion: American Jewish Immigration and Settlement in Palestine, 1917-1939
From New Zion to Old Zion: American Jewish Immigration and Settlement in Palestine, 1917-1939 Image

American Aliyah (immigration to Palestine) began in the mid-nineteenth century fueled by the desire of American Jews to study Torah and by their wish to live and be buried in the Holy Land. His movement of people-men and women-increased between World War I and II, in direct contrast to European Jewry’s desire to immigrate to the United States. Why would American Jews want to leave America, and what characterized their resettlement? From New Zion to Old Zion analyzes the migration of American Jews to Palestine between the two world wars and explores the contribution of these settlers to the building of Palestine.

From New Zion to Old Zion draws upon international archival correspondence, newspapers, maps, photographs, interviews, and fieldwork to provide students and scholars of immigration and settlement processes, the Yishuv (Jewish community in Palestine), and America-Holy Land studies a well-researched portrait of Aliyah.

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Author: Joseph B. Glass
From Sofia to Jaffa: The Jews of Bulgaria and Israel
From Sofia to Jaffa: The Jews of Bulgaria and Israel Image

Within two years of the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, an astounding 45,000 of Bulgaria’s 50,000 Jews left voluntarily for Israel. This mass exodus was remarkable considering that Bulgaria was the only Axis power to prevent the deportation of its Jews to the death camps during World War II. After their arrival in Israel, the Jews of Bulgaria were recognized as a model immigrant group in a fledgling state attempting to absorb hundreds of thousands of newcomers from more than eighty countries. They became known for their independence, self-reliance, honesty, and hard work.

From Sofia to Jaffa chronicles the fascinating saga of a population relocated, a story that has not been told until now. Beginning with a study of the community in Bulgaria and the factors that motivated them to leave their homeland, this book documents the journey of the Bulgarian Jews to Israel and their adaptation to life there.

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Author: Guy H. Haskell
Going Greek: Jewish College Fraternities in the United States, 1895-1945
Going Greek: Jewish College Fraternities in the United States, 1895-1945 Image

Going Greek offers an unprecedented look at the relationship between American Jewish students and fraternity life during its heyday in the first half of the twentieth century. More than secret social clubs, fraternities and sororities profoundly shaped the lives of members long after they left college—often dictating choices in marriage as well as business alliances. Widely viewed as a key to success, membership in these self-governing, sectarian organizations was desirable but not easily accessible, especially to non-Protestants and nonwhites. In Going Greek Marianne Sanua examines the founding of Jewish fraternities in light of such topics as antisemitism, the unique challenges faced by Jewish students on campuses across the United States, responses to World War II, and questions pertaining to assimilation and/or identity reinforcement.

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Author: Marianne R. Sanua
Harry Bertoia, Printmaker: Monotypes and Other Monographics
Harry Bertoia, Printmaker: Monotypes and Other Monographics Image

The seventy-nine monotypes in this catalogue represent the principal styles and themes that emerged not only in Harry Bertoia’s printmaking, but in his sculpture as well. June Kompass Nelson, author of Harry Bertoia, Sculptor, analyzes the graphic works and places them in the context of Bertoia’s total oeuvre, with particular regard to their relationship with his sculpture. A teacher of metalwork and printmaking at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, Bertoia began working in monotype in 1940—nearly a decade before his first attempts at sculpture—and continually returned to the medium until his death in 1978. Nelson’s introduction, biographical material, and well-documented chronology contribute to the portrait of a Michigan artist of international repute who maintained his “regionalist sensibility”.

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Author: June Kompass Nelson
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor Image

Harry Bertoia, Sculptor is devoted to the life and work of a twentieth-century Italian-born American artist whose important commissions are located in twenty-five American cities from New York to Seattle and from Minneapolis to Miami. It traces the development of Bertoia’s versatile career from his youth in Detroit, beginning with drawings, paintings, and monoprints, then jewelry and furniture designs, to his abstract sculptures in metals, many of architectural proportions.

The book includes a biography of the man and detailed descriptions of his methods of working. Many major sculptures and some minor ones are described in detail. They are critically analyzed for their aesthetic components and the ideas they were intended to express. A large number of photographs supplements the descriptions and analyses. Two appendixes give chronologies of the artist’s life and of his architectural commissions, the latter virtually a catalog of Bertoia’s major works. Based on several extensive interviews with the artist, as well as on research into his earlier writings, the book includes Bertoia’s thoughts on aesthetics and various phases of the art processes he uses. His work is categorized into four major aesthetic explorations that interested him most of his life.

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Author: June Kompass Nelson
In Fitting Memory: The Art and Politics of Holocaust Memorials
In Fitting Memory: The Art and Politics of Holocaust Memorials Image

In Fitting Memory, a critical survey of Holocaust memorials and monuments in Europe, Israel, and the United States, focuses on the archeological remains at the original sites of Nazi terror that constituted the first postwar memorials. The Holocaust is defined here as the collective designation for the Nazi mass murder of Jews, Gypsies, and the handicapped, and for the related persecution of Soviet prisoners of war and other ideological opponents. Featuring text and photographs, the book shows how, since 1945, memorials and monuments have served not only as secular shrines but also as temporal institutions reflecting changing public constituencies and distinctive political, social, and cultural contexts. Sybil Milton poses two vital and provocative questions about the memorials built since the end of World War II: to whose memory were they built and how fitting are they?

The Holocaust is a sensitive subject whose representation demands accuracy and tact. This volume, the first study of the institutionalization of public memory, demonstrates how various nations, politicians, and designers have attempted to do justice to this subject in public art and sculpture, and shows how national origin, ethnic allegiance, political ideology, and prevailing artistic style determined how memorials were commissioned and installed. His book also provides an analysis of the complex interrelationship between authentic historic sites, disparate and ephemeral representations of history, and the changing political and aesthetic balance between commemoration and escapism.

In Fitting Memory includes 127 specially commissioned photographs by Ira Nowinski from seven European countries, the United States, and Israel. Nine additional photographs are by photographers from Italy, the Netherlands, and the United States. The riveting images provide the reader with a visual tour of these memorials. Along with an annotated bibliography, the volume also contains a comprehensive list of memorials in Europe, the United States, and Israel. An essential tool for those interested in visiting the memorial sites, the book also provides a critical analysis for serious researchers.

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Author: Sybil Milton
Independent Man: The Life and Times of Senator James Couzens
Independent Man: The Life and Times of Senator James Couzens Image

First published in 1958 by Charles Scribner’s Sons, Independent Man is the only book-length biography of one of Michigan’s most remarkable men. His many careers embraced both the business and political spheres.

Couzens was a prominent businessman who helped shape Ford Motor Company, but he left the company when he and Henry Ford clashed over politics. Upon leaving Ford, Couzens began his political career, first serving as Detroit’s police commissioner. He went on to a controversial term as mayor of Detroit and then represented Michigan in the U.S. Senate. This book reveals the life of a truly unique and inspirational man.

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Author: Harry Barnard
Jewish Agricultural Utopias in America, 1880-1910
Jewish Agricultural Utopias in America, 1880-1910 Image

Brook Farm, Oneida, Amana, and Nauvoo are familiar names in American history. Far less familiar are New Odessa, Bethlehem-Jehudah, Cotopaxi, and Alliance—the Brook Farms and Oneidas of the Jewish people in North America.

The wealthy, westernized leaders of late nineteenth-century American Jewry and a member of the immigrating Russian Jews shared an eagerness to “repeal” the lengthy socioeconomic history in which European Jews were confined to petty commerce and denied agricultural experience. A small group of immigrant Jews chose to ignore urbanization and industrialization, defy the depression afflicting agriculture in the late 1800s, and devote themselves to experiments in collective farming in America.

Some of these idealists were pious; others were agnostics or atheists. Some had the support of American and West European philanthropists; others were willing to go it alone. But in the farming colonies they founded in Oregon, Colorado, the Dakotas, Michigan, Louisiana, Arkansas, Virginia, and New Jersey, among other places, they were sublimely indifferent to the need for careful planning and thus had limited success. Only in New Jersey, close to markets and supporters in New York and Philadelphia, were colonization efforts combined with agro-industrial enterprises; consequently, these colonies were able to survive for as long as one generation.

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Author: Uri D. Herscher
Jewish Buenos Aires, 1890- 1939: In Search of an Identity
Jewish Buenos Aires, 1890- 1939: In Search of an Identity Image

Victor Mirelman, in his study of the greatest concentration of Latin American Jewry, examines the changing facade of the Argentinean Jewish community from the beginning of mass Jewish immigration in 1890 to its decline in 1930. During this period, Jews arrived from Russia, Poland, Romania, Syria, Turkey and Morocco Each group founded its own synagogues. mutual help organizations. hospitals. cultural associations. and newspapers of particular vitality was the Yiddish press and the Yiddish theatre. Jewish immigrants were also especially active politically. particularly in the Socialist Party and in the workers’ unions.

Based on research in the Argentine archives. Jewish Buenos Aires, 1890-1930 describes the immigration and settlement process. studies the first generation of Argentine-born Jews. and provides an understanding of assimilation and acculturation. Mirelman discusses the religious life of the community differentiating between the Ashkenazim and the various Sephardic groups and devotes chapters to Zionism, to Jewish culture in Yiddish. Hebrew. and Spanish. to education; and to social action Issues that created conflict and friction are analyzed in detail.

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Author: Victor A. Mirelman
Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880-1939: Jewish Landsmanshaftn in American Culture
Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880-1939: Jewish Landsmanshaftn in American Culture Image

Landsmanshaftn, associations of immigrants from the same hometown, became the most popular form of organization among Eastern European Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880–1939, by Daniel Soyer, holds an in-depth discussion on the importance of these hometown societies that provided members with valuable material benefits and served as arenas for formal and informal social interaction. In addition to discussing both continuity and transformation as features of the immigrant experience, this approach recognizes that ethnic identity is a socially constructed and malleable phenomenon. Soyer explores this process of construction by raising more specific questions about what immigrants themselves have meant by Americanization and how their hometown associations played an important part in the process.

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Author: Daniel Soyer
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives from Israel
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives from Israel Image

Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives focuses on two central elements: textual research to examine the aesthetic qualities of the narrative, their division into genres, the various versions and their parallels, and acculturation in Israel, as well as contextual research to examine the performance art of the narrator and the role of the narrative as a communicative process in the narrating society. The collection includes twenty-one narratives by twelve storytellers; an account of the narrators’ lives and a commentary have been applied to each. In contrast to most anthologies of Jewish folktales, the texts in this book were recorded in the natural context of narration and in the language of origin (Judaeo-Arabic), meeting the most vigorous standards of current folklore scholarship.

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Author: Haya Bar-Itzhak and Aliza Shenhar
Jewish Poland - Legends of Origin: Ethnopoetics and Legendary Chronicles
Jewish Poland - Legends of Origin: Ethnopoetics and Legendary Chronicles Image

The first appearance of Jews in Poland and their adventures during their early years of settlement in the country are concealed in undocumented shadows of history. What survived are legends of origin that early chroniclers, historians, writers, and folklore scholars transcribed, thus contributing to their preservation. According to the legendary chronicles Jews resided in Poland for a millennium and developed a vibrant community.

Haya Bar-Itzhak examines the legends of origin of the Jews of Poland and discloses how the community creates its own chronicle, how it structures and consolidates its identity through stories about its founding, and how this identity varies from age to age. Bar-Itzhak also examines what happened to these legends after the extermination of Polish Jewry during the Holocaust, when the human space they describe no longer exists except in memory. For the Polish Jews after the Holocaust, the legends of origin undergo a fascinating transformation into legends of destruction.

Jewish Poland—Legends of Origin brings to light the more obscure legends of origin as well as those already well known. This book will be of interest to scholars in folklore studies as well as to scholars of Judaic history and culture.

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Author: Haya Bar-Itzhak
John Jacob Astor: Business and Finance in the Early Republic
John Jacob Astor: Business and Finance in the Early Republic Image

John Jacob Astor was the best-known and most important American businessman for more than a half-century. His career encompassed the country’s formative economic years from the precarious days following the American Revolution to the emergence of an urban-centered manufacturing economy in the late 1840s. Change was the dominant motif of the period, and Astor either exemplified the varied economic, social, and political changes in his business career or he directly affected the course of events.

In this biography of John Jacob Astor, John Denis Haeger uses Astor’s life and his career as a merchant, fur trader, and land speculator as vehicles for examining several important themes and issues in American economic and urban development between 1790 and 1860. Haeger addresses, in fascinating detail, the complexity of Astor’s business endeavors, his extensive connections with the country’s dominant political figures, and the “modern” business strategies and managerial techniques that he used to build his business empire.

Astor was clearly not a business revolutionary who radically altered an existing system. He was, however, an entrepreneur who exerted a profound change on an industry. He fascinated his contemporaries precisely because he so mirrored his age and its changing business and economic patterns. He grasped the greater size and complexity of an emerging commercial economy in post-Revolutionary America and adopted strategies and structures that transformed the fur and China trades. His investment in city real estate, stocks, bonds, and even a western city made him part of America’s evolution into an urbanindustrial society. For his era, John Astor’s career was remarkable for its modernity, vision, and reflection of American economic and political values.

More than just a personal biography, John Jacob Astor combines economic theories with a fascinating narrative that demonstrates, like no other book has, Astor’s impact on the early republic.

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Author: John Denis Haeger
Marketing Identities: The Invention of Jewish Ethnicity in Ost und West
Marketing Identities: The Invention of Jewish Ethnicity in Ost und West Image

Marketing Identities analyzes how Ost und West (East and West), the first Jewish magazine (1901-1923) published in Berlin by westernized Jews originally from Eastern Europe, promoted ethnic identity to Jewish audiences in Germany and throughout the world. Using sophisticated techniques of modern marketing, such as stereotyping, the editors of this highly successful journal attempted to forge a minority consciousness. Marketing Identities is thus about the beginnings of “ethnicity” as we know it in the late twentieth century. An interdisciplinary study, Marketing Identities illuminates present-day discussions in Europe and the Americas regarding the experience and self-understanding of minority groups and combines media and cultural studies with German and Jewish history.

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Author: David A. Brenner
Maurice Sugar: Law, Labor, and the Left in Detroit, 1912-1950
Maurice Sugar: Law, Labor, and the Left in Detroit, 1912-1950 Image

It was Maurice Sugar, labor activist and lawyer for the United Auto Workers, who played a key role in guiding the newly-formed union through the treacherous legal terrain obstructing its development in the 1930s. He orchestrated the injunction hearings on the Dodge Main strike and defended the legality of the sit-down tactic. As the UAW’s General Council, he wrote the union’s constitution in 1939, a model of democratic thinking. Sugar worked with George Addes, UAW Secretary-Treasurer, to nurture rank-and-file power. A founder of the National Lawyers’ Guild, Sugar also served as a member of Detroit’s Common Council at the head of a UAW “labor” ticket.

By 1947, Sugar was embroiled in a struggle within the UAW that he feared would destroy the open structures he had helped to build. He found himself in opposition to Walter Reuther’s bid to run the union. A long-time socialist, Sugar fell victim to mounting Cold War hysteria. When Reuther assumed control of the UAW, Sugar was summarily dismissed.

Christopher Johnson chronicles the life of Maurice Sugar, from his roots in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, through his resistance with Eugene V. Debs to World War I, and on to the struggles of the early 1930s to bring the union message to Detroit. Firmly grounded on the historiography of the UAW, Johnson shows the importance of Sugar and the Left in laying the foundation for unionizing the auto industry in the pre-UAW days. He documents the work of the Left in building a Black-labor coalition in Detroit, the importance of anti-Communism in Reuther’s rise to power, and the diminution of union democracy in the UAW brought about by the Cold War. Maurice Sugar represents a force in American life that bears recalling in these barren years of plant closings.

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Author: Christopher H. Johnson
Medieval Jewish Seals from Europe
Medieval Jewish Seals from Europe Image

Friedenberg’s work provides the first comprehensive study of the use of seals by Jews from the 12th to the 16th century and their role in transforming Europe from a barter economy to a money economy. Structuring his analysis by geographic regions, Friedenberg examines the physical nature of the seals and discusses the symbols and legends they employ. He examines their relation to similar Christian seals, their legal validity and use, and their prevalence in certain areas at certain times. In all, 177 seals are catalogued. Where the impressions are appended to documents, the document is also reviewed. Whenever possible, the seals are illustrated, as are the most significant documents, along with other seals, medals, coins, letters and paintings which serve to illuminate the discussion of a seal. The result is the definitive catalog of all known Jewish seals of the period.

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Author: Daniel M. Friedenberg
Nazism, The Jews and American Zionism, 1933-1948
Nazism, The Jews and American Zionism, 1933-1948 Image

Aaron Berman takes a moderate and measured approach to one of the most emotional issues in American Jewish historiography, namely, the response of American Jews to Nazism and the extermination of European Jewry.In remarkably large numbers, American Jews joined the Zionist crusade to create a Jewish state that would finally end the problem of Jewish homelessness, which they believed was the basic cause not only of the Holocaust but of all anti-Semitism. Though American Zionists could justly claim credit for the successful establishment of Israel in 1948, this triumph was not without cost. Their insistence on including a demand for Jewish statehood in any proposal to aid European Jewry politicized the rescue issue and made it impossible to appeal for American aid on purely humanitarian grounds.

The American Zionist response to Nazism also shaped he political turmoil in the Middle East which followed Israel’s creation. Concerned primarily with providing a home for Jewish refugees and fearing British betrayal, Zionists could not understand Arab protests in defense of their own national interests. Instead they responded to the Arab revolt with armed force and sought to insure their own claim to Palestine, Zionists came to link he Arabs with the Nazi and British forces that were opposed to the establishment of a Jewish state. In the thinking of American Zionists, the Arabs were steadily transformed from a people with whom an accommodation would have to be made into a mortal enemy to be defeated. Aaron Berman does not apologize for American Jews, but rather tries to understand the constraints within which they operated and what opportunities-if any-they had to respond to Hitler. In surveying the latest scholarship and responding o charges against American Jewry, Berman’s arguments are reasoned and reasonable.

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Author: Aaron Berman
No Haven for the Oppressed: United States Policy Toward Jewish Refugees, 1938-1945
No Haven for the Oppressed: United States Policy Toward Jewish Refugees, 1938-1945 Image

No Haven for the Oppressed is the most thorough and the most comprehensive analysis to be written to date on the United States policy toward Jewish refugees during World War II. Friedman draws upon many sources for his history, significantly upon papers which have only recently been opened to public scrutiny. These include State Department Records at the National Archives and papers relating to the Jewish refugee question at the Roosevelt Library at Hyde Park. Such documents serve as the foundation for this study, together with the papers of the American Friends Service Committee, of Rabbis Stephen Wise and Abba Silver, Senator Robert Wagner, Secretary Hull and Assistant Secretary of State Breckinridge Long, of the American Jewish Archives, the National Jewish Archives, and extensive interviews with persons intimately involved in the refugee question.

Professor Friedman describes America’s pre-war preoccupation with economic woes: immigrants, particularly Jewish immigrants, were viewed as competitors for scarce jobs. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, although personally sympathetic to the dilemma of Jews, was not willing to risk public and congressional support for his domestic programs by championing legislation or diplomacy to increase Jewish immigration. The court-packing scandal and the unsuccessful purge of Southern Democrats had left his popularity at an all-time low.

Jewish leaders were equally unwilling to antagonize the American public by strong advocacy of the Jewish cause. They feared anti-Semitic backlash against American Jews and worried that their own “100 percent” loyalty to the nation might be questioned.

Although he takes issue with authors who propose that anti-Semitism at the highest levels of the State Department was the major block to the rescue of the Jews, Friedman demonstrates that some officials continually thwarted rescue plans. He suggests that a disinclination to sully themselves in negotiations with the Nazis and a fear that any ransom would prolong the global conflict, caused the Allies to offer only token overtures to the Nazis on behalf of the Jews.

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Author: Saul S. Friedman
On Jewish Folklore
On Jewish Folklore Image

On Jewish Folklore spans a half-century of scholarly inquiry by the noted anthropologist and biblical scholar Raphael Patai. He essays collected in this volume, some of which are presented for the first time in English translation, provide a rich harvest of Jewish customs and traditional beliefs, gathered from all over the world and from ancient to modern times.

Among the subjects Dr. Patai investigated and recorded are the history and oral traditions of the now-vanished Marrano community of Meshhed, Iran; cultural change among the so-called Jewish Indians of Mexico; beliefs and customs in connection with birth, the rainbow, and the color blue; Jewish variants of the widespread custom of earth-eating; and the remarkable parallels between the rituals connected with enthroning a new king as described in the Bible and as practiced among certain African tribes.

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Author: Raphael Patai
Prayer & Community: The Havurah in American Judaism
Prayer & Community: The Havurah in American Judaism Image

Riv-Ellen Prell spent eighteen months of participant observation field research studying a countercultural havurah to determine why these groups emerged in the United States during the 1970s. In her book, she explores the central questions posed by the early havurot and their founders. She also examines the havurah as a development of American Judaism, continuing—rather than rejecting—many of the previous generations’ ideas about religion. Combining history and ethnography, Prell uses current theories about ritual and prayer to understand men’s and women’s struggles with their religious tradition and their desire to create community.

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Author: Riv-Ellen Prell
Queen of the Lakes
Queen of the Lakes Image

This book is an account of the ships that have borne the name “Queen of the Lakes,” an honorary title indicating that, at the time of its launching, a ship is the longest on the Great Lakes. In one of the most comprehensive books ever written on the maritime history of the lakes, Mark L. Thompson presents a vignette of each of the dozens of ships that have held the title, chronicling the dates the ship sailed, its dimensions, the derivation of its name, its role in the economic development of the region, and its sailing history. Through the stories of the individual ships, Thompson also describes the growth of ship design on the Great Lakes and the changing nature of the shipping industry on the lakes.

The launching of the first ship on Lake Ontario in 1678 – the diminutive Frontenac, a small, two-masted vessel of only about ten tons and no more than forty or forty-five feet long – set in motion an evolutionary process that has continued for more than three hundred years. That ship is the direct ancestor of all the ships that ever have operated on the Great Lakes, from the Str. Onoko, launched in 1882 and the first ship to bear the name Queen of the Lakes; to the Str. W. D. Rees, which held its title for only a few weeks, to today’s Queen, the Tregurtha, the longest ship on the lakes since its launching in 1981.

Although ships on the Great Lakes may be surpassed in size and efficiency by many of the modern ocean freighters, Thompson notes that the ships now sailing on the great freshwater seas of North America have achieved a level of operating mastery that is unrivaled anywhere else in the world, considering the inherent limitations of the Great Lakes system. The Tregurtha reigns as a model of unsurpassed maritime craftsmanship and as heir to a long and glorious tradition of excellence. Every magnificent ship that has borne the title in the past has contributed in some part to the greatness embodied in the Tregurtha. In time, her title as Queen of the Lakes will pass to another monumental freighter that will carry the art and science of shipbuilding and operation to even greater heights.

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Author: Mark L. Thompson
Rabbinic Judaism in the Making: The Halakhah from Ezra to Judah I
Rabbinic Judaism in the Making: The Halakhah from Ezra to Judah I Image

Through the ages, theology in Judaism has played roles of varying importance. But the role of theology is minor compared with that of law and observance. This book is devoted to a study of the evolution of normative Judaism from the time of Ezra (ca. 400 B.C.) to Judah I, the Prince (ca. 200 A.D.). Its focus on law represents a realistic approach to the history of applied Judaism.

Rabbinic Judaism in the Making is the first study in English to trace the evolution of Rabbinic Law and Rabbinic Judaism. A concise history of post-biblical normative Judaism in antiquity, Mr. Guttmann’s book concentrates on the crucial inter-testamental period, and should be valuable to students of ancient history, those interested in the history of the inter-testamental period, and both Christian and Jewish theologians, ministers, and rabbis.

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Author: Alexander Guttmann
Seasons of Grace: A History of the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit
Seasons of Grace: A History of the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit Image

Seasons of Grace is a history of the Catholic Church and community in southern lower Michigan from the 1830s through the 1950s. More than a chronicle of clerical successions and institutional expansion, the book also examines those social and cultural influences that affected the development of the Catholic community.

To document the course of institutional growth in the diocese, Tentler devotes a portion of the book to tracing the evolution of administrative structures at the Chancery and the founding of parishes, parochial schools, and social welfare organizations. Substantial attention is also given to the social history of the Catholic community, reflected in changes in religious practice, parish life and governance, and the role of women in church organizations and in devotional activities. Tentler also discusses the issue of Catholics in state and local politics and Catholic practice with regard to abortion, contraception, and intermarriage.

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Author: Leslie Woodcock Tentler
Songquest: The Journals of Great Lakes Folklorist Ivan H. Walton
Songquest: The Journals of Great Lakes Folklorist Ivan H. Walton Image

Ivan H. Walton was a pioneering folklorist who collected the songs and stories of aging sailors living along the shores of the Great Lakes in the 1930s. His collection is unique in the annals of Great Lakes folklore. It began as a search for songs but broadened into a collection of weather signs, shipboard beliefs, greenhorn tales, and stories of the intense rivalry between sailors and the steamboat men who replaced them. Edited by Joe Grimm, Songquest: The Journals of Great Lakes Folklorist Ivan H. Walton is a selection from the daily journals Walton wrote during his travels as a folklore collector.

It is clear that Walton, a professor of English at the University of Michigan, both admired the sailors of the Great Lakes for what they had done during their working years and worried about them as they entered the twilight of their lives. Walton went beyond the songs he set out to find and captured the pitch and roll of the Great Lakes alive with white-winged schooners. His writings provide a clear picture of the colorful individuals he met and interviewed—captains, cabin boys, tugmen, chandlers, boardinghouse owners, dredgers, and light keepers. Walton also documented the methods he used and recorded his personal thoughts about his nomadic life and the events going on around him during the 1930s, including the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s election, and the end of Prohibition.

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Author: Joe Grimm, Ivan H. Walton
Steamboats and Sailors of the Great Lakes
Steamboats and Sailors of the Great Lakes Image

The Great Lakes shipping industry can trace its lineage to 1679 with the launching on Lake Erie of the Griffon, a sixty-foot galley weighing nearly fifty tons. Built by LaSalle, a French explorer who had been commissioned to search for a passage through North America to China, it was the first sailing ship to operate on the upper lakes, signaling the dawn of the Great Lakes shipping industry as we know it today.

Steamboats and Sailors of the Great Lakes is the most thorough and factual study of the Great Lakes shipping industry written this century. Author Mark L. Thompson tells the fascinating story of the world’s most efficient bulk transportation system, describing the Great Lakes freighters, the cargoes of the great ships ,and the men and women who have served as crew. He documents the dramatic changes that have taken places in the industry and looks at the critical role that Great Lakes shipping plays in the economic well-being of the U.S. and Canada, despite the fact tat the size of the fleet and the amount of cargo carried have declined dramatically in recent years.

Spanning more than three centuries, from LaSalle’s voyage in 1679, through 1975 with the mysterious sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald, to life aboard today’s thousand-foot behemoths, this important volume documents the evolution of the industry through its “Golden Age” at the end of the nineteenth century to the present, with a downsized U.S. fleet that numbers fewer than seventy vessels.

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Author: Mark L. Thompson
Survival and Regeneration: Detroit’s American Indian Community
Survival and Regeneration: Detroit’s American Indian Community Image

Survival and Regeneration captures the heritage of Detroit’s colorful Indian community through printed sources and the personal life stories of many Native Americans. During a ten-year period, Edmund Jefferson Danziger, Jr. interviewed hundreds of Indians about their past and their needs and aspirations for the future. This history is essentially their success story.

In search of new opportunities, a growing number of rural Indians journeyed to Detroit after World War II. Destitute reservations had sapped their physical and cultural strength; paternalistic bureaucrats undermined their self-respect and confidence; and despairing tribal members too often sound solace in mind-numbing alcohol. Cut off from the Bureau of Indian Affairs services, many newcomers had difficulty establishing themselves successfully in the city and experienced feelings of insecurity and powerlessness. By 1970, they were one of the Motor City’s most “invisible” minority groups, so mobile and dispersed throughout the metropolitan area that not even the Indian organizations knew where they all lived.

To grasp the nature of their remarkable regeneration, this inspiring volume examines the historic challenges that Native American migrants to Detroit faced – adjusting to urban life, finding a good job and a decent place to live, securing quality medical care, educating their children, and maintaining their unique cultural heritage. Danziger scrutinizes the leadership that emerged within the Indian community and the formal native organizations through which the Indian community’s wide-ranging needs have been met. He also highlights the significant progress enjoyed by Detroit Indians – improved housing, higher educational achievement, less unemployment, and greater average family incomes – that has resulted from their persistence and self-determination.

Historically, the Motor City has provided an environment where lives could be refashioned amid abundant opportunities. Indians have not been totally assimilated, nor have they forsaken Detroit en masse for their former homelands. Instead, they have forged vibrant lives for themselves as Indian-Detroiters. They are not as numerous or politically powerful as their black neighbors, but the story of these native peoples leaves no doubt about their importance to Detroit and of the city’s effect on them.

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Author: Edmund Jefferson Danziger, Jr.
The Forerunners: Dutch Jewry in the North American Diaspora
The Forerunners: Dutch Jewry in the North American Diaspora Image

Between 1800 and 1880 approximately 6500 Dutch Jews immigrated to the United States to join the hundreds who had come during the colonial era. Although they numbered less than one-tenth of all Dutch immigrants and were a mere fraction of all Jews in America, the Dutch Jews helped build American Jewry and did so with a nationalistic flair. Like the other Dutch immigrant group, the Jews demonstrated the salience of national identity and the strong forces of ethnic, religious, and cultural institutions. They immigrated in family migration chains, brought special job skills and religious traditions, and founded at least three ethnic synagogues led by Dutch rabbis.

The Forerunners offers the first detailed history of the immigration of Dutch Jews to the United States and to the whole American diaspora. Robert Swierenga describes the life of Jews in Holland during the Napoleonic era and examines the factors that caused them to emigrate, first to the major eastern seaboard cities of the United States, then to the frontier cities of the Midwest, and finally to San Francisco. He provides a detailed look at life among the Dutch Jews in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New Orleans. This is a significant volume for readers interested in Jewish history, religious history, and comparative studies of religious declension. Immigrant and social historians likewise will be interested in this look at a religious minority group that was forced to change in the American environment.

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Author: Robert P. Swierenga
The Iron Hunter
The Iron Hunter Image

Originally published in 1919, The Iron Hunter is the autobiography of one of Michigan’s most influential and flamboyant historical figures: the reporter, publisher, explorer, politician, and twenty-seventh governor of Michigan, Chase Salmon Osborn (1860-1949). Making unprecedented use of the automobile in his 1910 campaign, Osborn ran a memorable campaign that was followed by an even more remarkable term as governor. In two years he eliminated Michigan’s deficit, ended corruption, and produced the state’s first workmen’s compensation law and a reform of the electoral process. His autobiography reflects the energy and enthusiasm of a reformer inspired by the Progressive Movement, but it also reveals the poetic spirit of an adventurer who fell in love with Michigan’s Upper Peninsula after traveling the world.

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Author: Chase S. Osborn
The Israeli-American Connection: Its Roots in the Yishuv, 1914-1945
The Israeli-American Connection: Its Roots in the Yishuv, 1914-1945 Image

The Israeli-American Connection examines the ways in which the American experience influenced some of the major leaders of the yishuv, the Jewish settlement in Palestine, during and between the world wars. In six biographical chapters, Michael Brown studies Vladimir Jabotinsky, Chaim Nahman Bialik, Berl Katznelson, Henrietta Szold, Golda Meir, and David Ben-Gurian, focusing on each leader’s involvement with and image of America, as well as the impact of America on their lives and careers.

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Author: Michael Brown
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume 1: “A Touch of Wildness”
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume 1: “A Touch of Wildness” Image

An imposing literary figure in America and Europe during the first half of the twentieth century, Ludwig Lewisohn (1882-1955) struggled with feelings of alienation in Christian America that were gradually resolved by his developing Jewish identity, a process reflected in hundreds of works of fiction, literary analysis, and social criticism. Born in Berlin, Lewisohn moved with his family in 1890 to South Carolina. Identified by others as a Jew, he remained an outsider throughout his youth. Lewisohn became a notable scholar and translator of German and French literature, teaching at Wisconsin and Ohio State. Following his mother’s death in 1914, he began to explore the Jewish life he had rejected, and by 1920 became a Zionist committed to fighting assimilation. Accusatory and inflammatory, his memoir Up Stream (1922) struck at the very heart of American culture and society, and caused great controversy and lasting enmity.

As strong emotional influences, the women in Lewisohn’s life—his mother and four wives—helped to frame his life and work. Believing himself liberated by the woman he declared his “spiritual wife” while legally married to another, he proclaimed the artist’s right to freedom in The Creative Life (1924), abandoned his editorship at The Nation, and fled to Europe. Lewisohn’s fictionalized account of his failed marriage, The Case of Mr. Crump (1926), once again attacked the empty morality of this world and won Sigmund Freud’s praise as the greatest psychological novel of the century.

A creator of one of Paris’s leading salons, Lewisohn ended his leisurely writer’s life in 1934 to awaken America to the growing Nazi threat. Poised to face the unfinished marital battle at home, but anxious to engage in the coming struggle for Jewish survival and the future of Western civilization, he set sail, unsure of what lay ahead.

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Author: Ralph Melnick
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume II: This Dark and Desperate Age
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume II: This Dark and Desperate Age Image

An imposing literary figure in America and Europe during the first half of the twentieth century, Ludwig Lewisohn (1882–1955) struggled with feelings of alienation in Christian America that were gradually resolved by his developing Jewish identity, a process reflected in hundreds of works of fiction, literary analysis, and social criticism.

This second volume portrays Lewisohn’s last decades as an outspoken opponent of Nazi Germany, a leading promoter of Jewish resettlement in Palestine, a member of Brandeis University’s first faculty, and one of the earliest voices advocating Jewish renewal in America. Despite his activism, Lewisohn was no longer welcome in Zionist circles by 1948 as a result of his “unacceptable” opinions concerning British intransigence, organizational politics, and, particularly, Jewish cultural and religious decline. However, the invitation to join the newly established Brandeis University as its only full professor provided him with the opportunity he sought to contribute to the reshaping of American Jewry. Lewisohn’s efforts would later bear fruit in the Jewish renewal movement of the next generation.

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Author: Ralph Melnick
The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer: Romance and Reform in Victorian England
The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer: Romance and Reform in Victorian England Image

Between 1830 and 1880, the Jewish community flourished in England. During this time, known as haskalah, or the Anglo-Jewish Enlightenment, Jewish women in England became the first Jewish women anywhere to publish novels, histories, periodicals, theological tracts, and conduct manuals. The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer analyzes this critical but forgotten period in the development of Jewish women’s writing in relation to Victorian literary history, women’s cultural history, and Jewish cultural history.

Michael Galchinsky demonstrates that these women writers were the most widely recognized spokespersons for the haskalah. Their romances, some of which sold as well as novels by Dickens, argued for Jew’s emancipation in the Victorian world and women’s emancipation in the Jewish world.

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Author: Michael Galchinsky
The Shaping of Jewish Identity in Nineteenth Century France
The Shaping of Jewish Identity in Nineteenth Century France Image

Nineteenth-century French Jewry was a community struggling to meet the challenges of emancipation and modernity. This struggle, with its origins in the founding of the French nation, constitutes the core of modern Jewish identity. With the Revolution of 1789 came the collapse of the social, political, and philosophical foundations of exclusiveness, forcing French society and the Jews to come to terms with the meaning of emancipation. Over time, the enormous challenge that emancipation posed for traditional Jewish beliefs became evident. In the 1830s, a more comprehensive ideology of regeneration emerged through the efforts of younger Jewish scholars and intellectuals. A response to the social and religious implications of emancipation, it was characterized by the demand for the elimination of rituals that violated the French conceptions of civilization and social integration; a drive for greater administrative centralization; and the quest for inter-communal and ethnic unity. In its various elements, regeneration formed a distinct ideology of emancipation that was designed to mediate Jewish interaction with French society and culture.

Jay Berkovitz reveals the complexities inherent in the processes of emancipation and modernization, focusing on the efforts of French Jewish leaders to come to terms with the social and religious implications of modernity. All in all, his emphasis on the intellectual history of French Jewry provides a new perspective on a significant chapter of Jewish history.

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Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
The Troubled Origins of the Italian Catholic Labor Movement, 1878–1914
The Troubled Origins of the Italian Catholic Labor Movement, 1878–1914 Image

In his book, Sándor Agócs explores the conflicts that accompanied the emergence of the Italian Catholic labor movement. He examines the ideologies that were at work and details the organizational forms they inspired.

During the formative years of the Italian labor movement, Neo-Thomism became the official ideology of the church. Church leadership drew upon the central Thomistic principal of caritas, Christian love, in its response to the social climate in Italy, which had become increasingly charged with class consciousness and conflict. Aquinas’s principles ruled out class struggle as contrary to the spirit of Christianity and called for a symbiotic relationship among the various social strata. Neo-Thomistic philosophy also emphasized the social functions of property, a principle that demanded the paternalistic care and tutelage of the interests of working people by the wealthy.

In applying these principles to the nascent labor movement, the church’s leadership called for a mixed union (misto), whose membership would include both capitalists and workers. They argued that this type of union best reflected the tenets of Neo-Thomistic social philosophy. In addition, through its insistence on the misto, the church was also motivated by an obsessive concern with socialism, which it viewed as a threat, and by a fear of the working classes, which it associated with socialism, which it viewed as a threat, and by a fear of the working classes, which it associated with socialism. In pressing for the mixed union, therefore, the church leadership hoped not only to realize Neo-Thomistic principles, but also to defuse class struggle and prevent the proletariat from becoming a viable social and political force.

Catholic activists, who were called upon to put ideas into practice and confronted social realities daily, learned that the “mixed” unions were a utopian vision that could not be realized. They knew that the age of paternalism was over and that neither the workers not the capitalists were interested in the mixed union. In its stead, the activists urged for the “simple” union, an organization for workers only. The conflict which ensued pitted the bourgeoisie and the Catholic hierarchy against the young activists.

Sándor Agócs reveals precisely in what way Catholic social thought was inadequate to deal with the realities of unionization and why Catholics were unable to present a reasonable alternative.

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Author: Sándor Agócs
Toast of the Town: The Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson
Toast of the Town: The Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson Image

As part of the great migration of southern blacks to the north, Sunnie Wilson came to Detroit from South Carolina after graduating from college, and soon became a pillar of the local music industry. He started out as a song and dance performer but found his niche as a local promoter of boxing, which allowed him to make friends and business connections quickly in the thriving industrial city of Detroit. Part oral history, memoir, and biography, Toast of the Town draws from hundreds of hours of taped conversations between Sunnie Wilson and John Cohassey, as Wilson reflected on the changes in Detroit over the last sixty years. Supported by extensive research, Wilson’s reminiscences are complemented by photographs from his own collection, which capture the spirit of the times.
Through Sunnie Wilson’s narrative, Detroit’s glory comes alive, bringing back nights at the hopping Forest Club on Hastings Street, which hosted music greats like Nat King Cole and boasted the longest bar in Michigan, and sunny afternoons at Lake Idlewild, the largest black resort in the United States that attracted thousands every weekend from all over the Midwest. An influential insider’s perspective, Toast of the Town fills a void in the documented history of Detroit’s black and entertainment community from the 1920s to the present.

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Author: Sunnie Wilson with John Cohassey
Tradition and Politics: The Religious Parties of Israel
Tradition and Politics: The Religious Parties of Israel Image

Tradition and Politics is acomprehensive study of the religious parties of Israel. Gary S. Schiff traces the religious parties of the modern state of Israel from their origins in Europe early in the twentieth century to, in response and reaction to the rise of Zionism, their transplantation to Palestine, their adaptation to the new realities, their participation in the quazi-government of the Jewish community under the British mandate, and their unfolding roles after independence. Schiff examines a subject that has long fascinated and perplexed observers of the Israeli scene: the existence of four separate and distinct religious political parties within the Israeli political spectrum. Each party claims to be the one exponent of traditional Judaism; each demonstrates a distinctive political personality based on its historical development and ideological perspective.Religious (traditionalist) parties emerge in reaction to the pressures and predicaments of modernization and help to legitimize modernizing states in the eyes of traditional sectors of the public. Schiff finds the key to the uniqueness of the Israeli parties to be their divergent attitudes toward the relationship between tradition and modernity. After the labyrinthine histories of Israel’s religious parties in both pre-state and post-independent eras, Schiff turns his attention to several key religious and state institutions: the Ministry of Religions, the chief rabbinate, and the separate religious school systems, and to some of the controversial issues that have racked Israeli society—for example, the question of “Who is a Jew?” and the controversy over Sabbath legislation. He concludes with an analysis of the special significance of the religious parties in the Israeli political system.

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Author: Gary S. Schiff
Twenty Israeli Composers
Twenty Israeli Composers Image

Israel’s contemporary art music reflects a modern society that is an intricate fabric of national and ethnic origins, languages and dialects, customs and traditions—a heterogeneous culture of cultures. It is a rich and distinctive environment—at once ancient and modern, spiritual and secular, traditional and progressive.

Twenty Israeli Composers, the first published collection of interviews with Israeli composers, explores this developing and distinctive music culture. The featured composers have earned distinction in Israel and abroad, and reflect the pluralism of Israeli art music, culture, and society. In first-person narrative, they discuss the interaction of inspiration, method, and cultural context in their work, revealing both international and national influence and scope. Three generations of contemporary composers-immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe, North and South America, and naïve sabras- share their ideas about music, the creative process, and their experiences as artists living and working in Israel. Robert Fleisher furnishes a biographical sketch of each composer, followed by a summary of recent accomplishments. The book also includes a bibliography, discography, and information for further study.

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Author: Robert Fleisher
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 1
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 1 Image

In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776.

Volume I focuses on the American revolution and the early national period, from 1776 to 1840. Marcus examines the role played by Jews in the revolution and discusses important historical and social themes such as politics, commerce, religion, Jewish and American culture, anti-Jewish prejudices, and the phenomenon of assimilation.

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Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 2, The Germanic Period
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 2, The Germanic Period Image

In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776.

The second volume of this seminal work on American Jewry covers the period from 1841 to 1860. Unlike the early Jewish settlers, these immigrants were Ashkenazim from Europe’s Germanic countries. Marcus follows the movement of these “German” Jews into all regions west of the Hudson River.

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Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 3, The Germanic Period, Part 2
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 3, The Germanic Period, Part 2 Image

In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776.

The third volume covers the period from 1860 to 1920, beginning with the Jews, slavery, and the Civil War, and concluding with the rise of Reform Judaism as well as the increasing spirit of secularization that characterized emancipated, prosperous, liberal Jewry before it was confronted by a rising tide of American anti-Semitism in the 1920s.

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Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 4, The East European Period, The Emergence of the American Jew Epilogue
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 4, The East European Period, The Emergence of the American Jew Epilogue Image

In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776.

In the fourth and final volume of this set, Marcus deals with the coming and challenge of the East European Jews from 1852 to 1920. He explores settlement and colonization, dispersal to rural areas, life in large cities, the proletarians, the garment industry, the unions, and socialism. He also describes the life of the middle and upper class East European Jew. Special attention is paid to the growth of Zionism. In the epilogue, Marcus writes about the evolution of the “American Jew.”

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Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
Uppermost Canada: The Western District and the Detroit Frontier, 1800-1850
Uppermost Canada: The Western District and the Detroit Frontier, 1800-1850 Image

Uppermost Canada examines the historical, cultural, and social history of the Canadian portion of the Detroit River community in the first half of the nineteenth century. The phrase “Uppermost Canada,” denoting the western frontier of Upper Canada (modern Ontario), was applied to the Canadian shore of the Detroit River during the War of 1812 by a British officer, who attributed it to President James Madison. The Western District was one of the partly-judicial, partly-governmental municipal units combining contradictory arisocratic and democratic traditions into which the province was divided until 1850. With its substantial French-Canadian population and its veneer of British officialdom, in close proximity to a newly American outpost, the Western District was potentially the most unstable. Despite all however, Alan Douglas demonstrates that the Western District endured without apparent change longer than any of the others.

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Author: R. Alan Douglas
Without Bounds: The Life and Death of Rabbi Ya'aqov Wazana
Without Bounds: The Life and Death of Rabbi Ya

Without Bounds illuminates the life of the mysterious Rabbi Ya’aqov Wazana, a Jewish healer who worked in the Western High Atlas region in southern Morocco and died there in the early 1950s. Impressed by his healing powers and shamanic virtuosity, Moroccan Jews are intrigued by his lifestyle and contacts with the Muslim and the demonic worlds that dangerously blurred his Jewish identity.

Based on interviews with Moroccan Jews conducted in the late 1980s, Without Bounds proposes multiple readings of Wazana’s life. Yoram Bilu re-creates the influences and important moments in Wazana’s life and evaluates his character from psychological and anthropological perspectives.

Human- and demon-bound, holy and impure, Jew and Muslim, old and young, Rabbi Ya’aqov Wazana dissolved the boundaries of the major social categories in Morocco and integrated them into his identity.

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Author: Yoram Bilu
Witness Through the Imagination: Jewish American Holocaust Literature
Witness Through the Imagination: Jewish American Holocaust Literature Image

Criticism of Holocaust literature is an emerging field of inquiry, and as might be expected, the most innovative work has been concentrated on the vanguard of European and Israeli Holocaust literature. Now that American fiction has amassed an impressive and provocative Holocaust canon, the time is propitious for its evaluation. Witness Through the Imagination presents a critical reading of themes and stylistic strategies of major American Holocaust fiction to determine its capacity to render the prelude, progress, and aftermath of the Holocaust.

The unifying critical approach is the textual explication of themes and literary method, occasional comparative references to international Holocaust literature, and a discussion of extra-literary Holocaust sources that have influenced the creative writers’ treatment of the Holocaust universe.

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Author: S. Lillian Kremer
Working Detroit
Working Detroit Image

Babson recounts Detroit’s odyssey from a bulwark of the “open shop” to the nation’s foremost “union town.” Through words and pictures, Working Detroit documents the events in the city’s ongoing struggle to build an industrial society that is both prosperous and humane.

Babson begins his account in 1848 when Detroit has just entered the industrial era. He weaves the broader historical realties, such as Red Scare, World War, and economic depression into his account, tracing the ebb and flow of the working class activity and organization in Detroit — from the rise of the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor in the 19th century, through the Congress of Industrial Organizations and the sitdown strike of the 1930s, to the civil rights and women’s movements of the 1960s and 1970s. The book concludes with an examination of the present day crisis facing the labor movement.

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Author: Steve Babson with Ron Alpern, Dave Elsila, and John Revitte
A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States Image
A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States
This book contains entries from thousands of publications whether in English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and German—books, research reports, educational and general periodicals, synagogue histories, conference proceedings, bibliographies, and encyclopedias—on all aspects of Jewish education from pre-school through secondary education.   
Author: Compiled and Edited by Norman Drachler
ISBN: 9780814343494
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
All Our Yesterdays: A Brief History of Detroit Image
All Our Yesterdays: A Brief History of Detroit
All Our Yesterdays is an accurate account based on extensive historical research when initially published in 1969, and is written in such a style as to make interesting and historical snapshot of the history of the city of Detroit. The authors recount the founding of the town by the French, control by the British, and growth as an American city. These episodes are recounted in the words and deeds of the people who lived and worked here, men like Judge Woodward, Father Gabriel Richard, and Governor Lewis Cass. The reader meets, among others, old General Hull surrendering the city to the British General Brock, dread cholera epidemics killing hundreds of residents, a man named Vernor making up a batch of excellent ginger ale to sell in his drug store, and Charles King building and driving the city’s first motor car. Here are also accounts of the expansion of the automobile industry, the days of the Roaring Twenties, Prohibition, Great Depression, World Wars I and II, and the city of the 1950s and 1960s. This is the story of a great city; a story of past deeds, present problems, and future hopes. But more important, this is a story by and about the people of Detroit, for it is the people that have made this city great.  
Author: Frank B. Woodford and Arthur M. Woodford
ISBN: 9780814343401
Binding: E-Book
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All-American Anarchist: Joseph A. Labadie and the Labor Movement Image
All-American Anarchist: Joseph A. Labadie and the Labor Movement
All-American Anarchist chronicles the life and work of Joseph A. Labadie (1850-1933), Detroit’s prominent labor organizer and one of early labor’s most influential activists. A dynamic participant in the major social reform movements of the Gilded Age, Labadie was a central figure in the pervasive struggle for a new social order as the American Midwest underwent rapid industrialization at the end of the nineteenth century. This engaging biography follows Labadie’s colorful career from a childhood among a Pottawatomie tribe in the Michigan woods through his local and national involvement in a maze of late nineteenth-century labor and reform activities, including participation in the Socialist Labor party, Knights of Labor, Greenback movement, trades councils, typographical union, eight-hour-day campaigns, and the rise of the American Federation of Labor. Although he received almost no formal education, Labadie was a critical thinker and writer, contributing a column titled “Cranky Notions” to Benjamin Tucker’s Liberty, the most important journal of American anarchism. He interacted with such influential rebels and reformers as Eugene V. Debs, Emma Goldman, Henry George, Samuel Gompers, and Terence V. Powderly, and was also a poet of both protest and sentiment, composing more than five hundred poems between 1900 and 1920. Affectionately known as Detroit’s “Gentle Anarchist,” Labadie’s flamboyant and amiable personality counteracted his caustic writings, making him one of the city’s most popular figures throughout his long life despite his dissident ideals. His individualistic anarchist philosophy was also balanced by his conventional personal life – he was married to a devout Catholic and even worked for the city’s water commission to make ends meet. In writing this biography of her grandfather, Carlotta R. Anderson consulted the renowned Labadie Collection at the University of Michigan, a unique collection of protest literature which extensively documents pivotal times in American labor history and radical history. She also had available a large collection of family scrapbooks, letters, photographs, and Labadie’s personal account book. Including passages from Labadie’s vast writings, poems, and letters, All-American Anarchist traces America’s recurring anti-anarchist and anti-radical frenzy and repression, from the 1886 Haymarket bombing backlash to the Red Scares of the twentieth century.  
Author: Carlotta R. Anderson
ISBN: 9780814343272
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Ambiguous Relations: The American Jewish Community and Germany Since 1945 Image
Ambiguous Relations: The American Jewish Community and Germany Since 1945
The reemergence of a united Germany as a dominant power in Europe has increased even more it’s importance as a major political ally and trade partner of the United States, despite the misgivings of some U.S. citizens. Ambiguous Relations addresses for the first time the complex relationships between American Jews and Germany over the fifty years following the end of World War II, and examines American Jewry’s’ ambiguous attitude toward Germany that continues despite sociological and generational changes within the community. Shlomo Shafir recounts attempts by American Jews to influence U.S. policy toward Germany after the ware and traces these efforts through President Reagan’s infamous visit to Bitburg and beyond. He shows how Jewish demands for justice were hampered not only by America’s changing attitude toward West Germany as a postwar European power but also by the distraction of anti-communist hysteria in this country. In evaluating the impact of Jewish pressure on American public opinion and on the West German government, Shafir discusses the rationales and strategies of Jewish communal and religious groups, legislators, and intellectuals, as well as the rise of Holocaust consciousness and the roles of Israel and surviving German Jewish communities. He also describes the efforts of German diplomats to assuage American Jewish hostility and relates how the American Jewish community has been able to influence German soul-searching regarding their historical responsibility and even successfully intervened to bring war criminals to trial. Based on extensive archival research in Germany, Israel, and the Unities States, Ambiguous Relations in the first book to examine this tenuous situation in such depth. It is a comprehensive account of recent history that comes to groups with emotional and political reality.  
Author: Shlomo Shafir
ISBN: 9780814345078
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
American Aliya: Portrait of an Innovative Migration Movement Image
American Aliya: Portrait of an Innovative Migration Movement
  The major focus is on the who, when, and where of American immigration to Israel, but it is the “why” of this aliya which constitutes the core of the book.  Waxman analyzes the relationship between Zionism, aliya, and the Jewish experience.  Chapters include “Zion in Jewish culture,” a synopsis of Zionism through the years, and “American Jewry and the land of Israel in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries,” an account of proto-Zionist ideas and movements in early America. Chaim I. Waxman delivers a broad analysis of the phenomenon of American migration to Israel – aliya.  Working within the context of the sociology of migration, Waxman provides primary research into a variety of dimensions of this movement and demonstrates the inadequacy of current migration theories to characterize aliya.  
Author: Chaim I. Waxman
ISBN: 9780814343418
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
American Jewry and the Holocaust: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945 Image
American Jewry and the Holocaust: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945
In this volume Yehudi Bauer describes the efforts made to aid European victims of World War II by the New York-based American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, American Jewry’s chief representative abroad. Drawing on the mass of unpublished material in the JDC archives and other repositories, as well as on his thorough knowledge of recent and continuing research into the Holocaust, he focuses alternately on the personalities and institutional decisions in New York and their effects on the JDC workers and their rescue efforts in Europe. He balances personal stories with a country-by-country account of the fate of Jews through ought the war years: the grim statistics of millions deported and killed are set in the context of the hopes and frustrations of the heroic individuals and small groups who actively worked to prevent the Nazis’ Final Solution. This study is essential reading for anyone who seeks to understand the American Jewish response to European events from 1939 to 1945. Bauer confronts the tremendous moral and historical questions arising from JDC’s activities. How great was the danger? Who should be saved first? Was it justified to use illegal or extralegal means? What country would accept Jewish refugees? His analysis also raises an issue which perhaps can never be answered: could American Jews have done more if they had grasped the reality of the Holocaust?  
Author: Yehuda Bauer
ISBN: 9780814343470
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Anti-Semitic Stereotypes without Jews: Images of the Jews in England 1290-1700 Image
Anti-Semitic Stereotypes without Jews: Images of the Jews in England 1290-1700
Anti-Semitic Stereotypes Without Jews offers an exploration of English history, 1290- 1700, tracing the growth and development of these attitudes. It demonstrates that it is possible for prejudice to thrive even in the absence of a scapegoat group. Following the expulsion in the year 1290 until 1656, although there was no real Jewish community in England, the molders of public opinion kept a shadowy image of the Jew alive through sermons and religious tracts, travelogues, folklore, religious and secular drama. In his analysis, Dr. Glassman shows that despite their theological differences, Anglican, Puritan, and Catholic clergymen concurred in the negative images of Jews presented to their congregations. They pictured the Jews as Christ-killers, and related myths of how Jews performed barbaric and sacrilegious rituals. The image was to plague Anglo-Jewry after a small community was reestablished in the second half of the 17th century. The author’s belief that anti-Semitism is primarily a Christian problem transcends both time and place is covered by this volume. Anti-Semitic sentiments are seen here as reflecting deep-seated, irrational responses to the Jewish people, rooted in the teachings of the church and exploited by men who needed an outlet for religious, social, and economic frustrations.  
Author: Bernard Glassman
ISBN: 9780814343531
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Constructing Modern Identities: Jewish University Students in Germany, 1815-1914 Image
Constructing Modern Identities: Jewish University Students in Germany, 1815-1914
The emergence of Jewish student associations in 1881 provided a forum for Jews to openly proclaim their religious heritage. By examining the lives and social dynamics of Jewish university students, Keith Pickus shows how German Jews rearranged their self-images and redefined what it meant to be Jewish. Not only did the identities crafted by these students enable them to actively participate in German society, they also left an indelible imprint on contemporary Jewish culture. Pickus’s portrayal of the mutability and social function of Jewish self-definition challenges previous scholarship that depicts Jewish identity as a static ideological phenomenon. By illuminating how identities fluctuated throughout life, he demonstrates that adjusting one’s social relationships to accommodate the Gentile and Jewish worlds became the norm rather than the exception for 19th-century German Jews.   
Author: Keith H. Pickus
ISBN: 9780814343517
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Detroit on Stage: The Players Club, 1910-2005 Image
Detroit on Stage: The Players Club, 1910-2005
Founded in 1910, Detroit’s Players Club is an all-male club devoted to the production of theater by members for other members’ enjoyment. Called simply “The Players,” members of the club design, direct, and act in the shows, including playing the female roles. In Detroit on Stage, Marijean Levering takes readers behind the scenes of the club’s private “frolics” to explore the unique history of The Players, discover what traditions they still hold dear, and examine why they have survived relatively unscathed through changes that have shuttered older and more venerable institutions. The Players developed during a nationwide vogue for community and art theater and also as Detroit’s auto elites were in the midst of forming new private clubs to add to their own sense of prestige. By the 1920s, The Players had built their own playhouse and established most of their significant traditions, including the monthly frolics, at which the members perform for each other. At the frolics, members in the audience would wear tuxedos and drink beer out of personalized mugs, customs that remain to this day. Prominent Detroiters have always been among the ranks of the Players, and several well-known auto industry figures were members from the beginning, including banker Henry B. Joy, Oldsmobile sales manager Roy D. Chapin, and Ford executives James Couzens and Edsel Ford. Over the decades that followed the club’s founding, its membership and traditions have remained strong despite major world events that shook Detroit such as Prohibition, the Great Depression, and World War II. In looking at The Players of today, Levering explores the camaraderie and sense of history that has kept the club together and relatively unchanged throughout the years. She also examines the club’s notable members and its unique place in Detroit history. Detroit on Stage places The Players club in the broader contexts of social clubs, explaining how these organizations originate and function. Readers interested in Detroit cultural history and theater studies will enjoy this rare glimpse inside a long-standing Detroit cultural institution.   
Author: Marijean Levering
ISBN: 9780814343234
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Detroit to Fort Sackville, 1778-1779: The Journal of Normand MacLeod Image
Detroit to Fort Sackville, 1778-1779: The Journal of Normand MacLeod
In 1777 Normand MacLeod, a British army officer, assumed the post of town major of Detroit, then a British colony on the frontier of late eighteenth-century America. Although it was not in the forefront of action in the American Revolution, the fort at Detroit had an important role because its strategic location made it a point of interest to military leaders on both sides. Under the leadership of Captain Normand MacLeod, the city of Detroit played a role in the War for Independence that is described in detail in this journal. During the bitter winter of 1778-79, MacLeod led a party of Detroit Volunteer Militia in advance of Henry Hamilton’s main force. Hamilton was attempting to hold Fort Sackville (modern Vincennes, Indiana) against George Rogers Clark and his troops. MacLeod was a shrewd and witty reporter. His diary, published for the first time in this volume, details the daily routine of the arduous midwinter military campaign. He describes daily life within the walls of the fort at Detroit, the military adventures planned within those walls, and the rumors, the gossip, and the personal relationships within the community. Offering an unprecedented personal glimpse of Detroit life in the years 1778-79, the diary preserves the flavor of one bitter winter of the American Revolution of special significance for historians of Michigan and Detroit. William A. Evans’s introduction to the journal places MacLeod’s expedition in the context of Hamilton’s strategy and provides a biographical account of MacLeod himself that has not been available previously.
Author: Normand MacLeod, Edited by William A. Evans and Elizabeth Sklar
ISBN: 9780814343388
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968 Image
Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968
Although historians have devoted a great deal of attention to the development of federal government policy regarding civil rights in the quarter century following World War II, little attention has been paid to the equally important developments at the state level. Few states underwent a more dramatic transformation with regard to civil rights than Michigan did. In 1948, the Michigan Committee on Civil Rights characterized the state of civil rights in Michigan as presenting “an ugly picture.” Twenty years later, Michigan was a leader among the states in civil rights legislation. “Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights” documents this important shift in state level policy and makes clear that civil rights in Michigan embraced not only blacks but women, the elderly, native Americans, migrant workers, and the physically handicapped.  
Author: Sidney Fine
ISBN: 9780814343296
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
For Our Soul: Ethiopian Jews in Israel Image
For Our Soul: Ethiopian Jews in Israel
Between 1977 and 1992, practically all Ethiopian Jews migrated to Israel. This mass move followed the 1974 revolution in Ethiopia and its ensuing economic and political upheavals, compounded by the brutality of the military regime and the willingness—after years of refusal—of the Israeli government to receive them as bona fide Jews entitled to immigrate to that country. As the sole Jewish community from sub-Sahara Africa in Israel, the Ethiopian Jews have met with unique difficulties. Based on fieldwork conducted over several years, For Our Soul describes the ongoing process of adjustment and absorption that the Ethiopian Jewish immigrants, also known as Falasha or Beta Israel, experienced in Israel.  
Author: Teshome G. Wagaw
ISBN: 9780814344095
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
From East to West: The Westward Migration of Jews from Eastern Europe During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Image
From East to West: The Westward Migration of Jews from Eastern Europe During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
Migration has been a major factor in the life of the Jewish people throughout the two and a half millennia of their dispersion. And yet, the history of the Jewish migratory movements has not been fully explored in Jewish history. While the Jewish migratory movements in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and especially immigration to the New World, have attracted the attention of scholars, earlier such movements did not. In the present book I propose to discuss such a movement of an earlier period, that from Eastern Europe to the countries of the West, from its inception at the beginning of the seventeenth century to the dissolution of the old Polish commonwealth.  Since this book deals with the history of a Jewish migratory movement, it should be understood that unless otherwise indicated, the terms emigrants, immigrants, and migrants refer to Jews.   
Author: Moses A. Shulvass
ISBN: 9780814343456
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
From New Zion to Old Zion: American Jewish Immigration and Settlement in Palestine, 1917-1939 Image
From New Zion to Old Zion: American Jewish Immigration and Settlement in Palestine, 1917-1939
American Aliyah (immigration to Palestine) began in the mid-nineteenth century fueled by the desire of American Jews to study Torah and by their wish to live and be buried in the Holy Land. His movement of people-men and women-increased between World War I and II, in direct contrast to European Jewry’s desire to immigrate to the United States. Why would American Jews want to leave America, and what characterized their resettlement? From New Zion to Old Zion analyzes the migration of American Jews to Palestine between the two world wars and explores the contribution of these settlers to the building of Palestine. From New Zion to Old Zion draws upon international archival correspondence, newspapers, maps, photographs, interviews, and fieldwork to provide students and scholars of immigration and settlement processes, the Yishuv (Jewish community in Palestine), and America-Holy Land studies a well-researched portrait of Aliyah.   
Author: Joseph B. Glass
ISBN: 9780814344224
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
From Sofia to Jaffa: The Jews of Bulgaria and Israel Image
From Sofia to Jaffa: The Jews of Bulgaria and Israel
Within two years of the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, an astounding 45,000 of Bulgaria’s 50,000 Jews left voluntarily for Israel. This mass exodus was remarkable considering that Bulgaria was the only Axis power to prevent the deportation of its Jews to the death camps during World War II. After their arrival in Israel, the Jews of Bulgaria were recognized as a model immigrant group in a fledgling state attempting to absorb hundreds of thousands of newcomers from more than eighty countries. They became known for their independence, self-reliance, honesty, and hard work. From Sofia to Jaffa chronicles the fascinating saga of a population relocated, a story that has not been told until now. Beginning with a study of the community in Bulgaria and the factors that motivated them to leave their homeland, this book documents the journey of the Bulgarian Jews to Israel and their adaptation to life there.   
Author: Guy H. Haskell
ISBN: 9780814344057
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Going Greek: Jewish College Fraternities in the United States, 1895-1945 Image
Going Greek: Jewish College Fraternities in the United States, 1895-1945
Going Greek offers an unprecedented look at the relationship between American Jewish students and fraternity life during its heyday in the first half of the twentieth century. More than secret social clubs, fraternities and sororities profoundly shaped the lives of members long after they left college—often dictating choices in marriage as well as business alliances. Widely viewed as a key to success, membership in these self-governing, sectarian organizations was desirable but not easily accessible, especially to non-Protestants and nonwhites. In Going Greek Marianne Sanua examines the founding of Jewish fraternities in light of such topics as antisemitism, the unique challenges faced by Jewish students on campuses across the United States, responses to World War II, and questions pertaining to assimilation and/or identity reinforcement.   
Author: Marianne R. Sanua
ISBN: 9780814344187
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Harry Bertoia, Printmaker: Monotypes and Other Monographics Image
Harry Bertoia, Printmaker: Monotypes and Other Monographics
The seventy-nine monotypes in this catalogue represent the principal styles and themes that emerged not only in Harry Bertoia’s printmaking, but in his sculpture as well. June Kompass Nelson, author of Harry Bertoia, Sculptor, analyzes the graphic works and places them in the context of Bertoia’s total oeuvre, with particular regard to their relationship with his sculpture. A teacher of metalwork and printmaking at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, Bertoia began working in monotype in 1940—nearly a decade before his first attempts at sculpture—and continually returned to the medium until his death in 1978. Nelson’s introduction, biographical material, and well-documented chronology contribute to the portrait of a Michigan artist of international repute who maintained his “regionalist sensibility”.   
Author: June Kompass Nelson
ISBN: 9780814343708
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor Image
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor
Harry Bertoia, Sculptor is devoted to the life and work of a twentieth-century Italian-born American artist whose important commissions are located in twenty-five American cities from New York to Seattle and from Minneapolis to Miami. It traces the development of Bertoia’s versatile career from his youth in Detroit, beginning with drawings, paintings, and monoprints, then jewelry and furniture designs, to his abstract sculptures in metals, many of architectural proportions. The book includes a biography of the man and detailed descriptions of his methods of working. Many major sculptures and some minor ones are described in detail. They are critically analyzed for their aesthetic components and the ideas they were intended to express. A large number of photographs supplements the descriptions and analyses. Two appendixes give chronologies of the artist’s life and of his architectural commissions, the latter virtually a catalog of Bertoia’s major works. Based on several extensive interviews with the artist, as well as on research into his earlier writings, the book includes Bertoia’s thoughts on aesthetics and various phases of the art processes he uses. His work is categorized into four major aesthetic explorations that interested him most of his life.  
Author: June Kompass Nelson
ISBN: 9780814343715
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
In Fitting Memory: The Art and Politics of Holocaust Memorials Image
In Fitting Memory: The Art and Politics of Holocaust Memorials
In Fitting Memory, a critical survey of Holocaust memorials and monuments in Europe, Israel, and the United States, focuses on the archeological remains at the original sites of Nazi terror that constituted the first postwar memorials. The Holocaust is defined here as the collective designation for the Nazi mass murder of Jews, Gypsies, and the handicapped, and for the related persecution of Soviet prisoners of war and other ideological opponents. Featuring text and photographs, the book shows how, since 1945, memorials and monuments have served not only as secular shrines but also as temporal institutions reflecting changing public constituencies and distinctive political, social, and cultural contexts. Sybil Milton poses two vital and provocative questions about the memorials built since the end of World War II: to whose memory were they built and how fitting are they? The Holocaust is a sensitive subject whose representation demands accuracy and tact. This volume, the first study of the institutionalization of public memory, demonstrates how various nations, politicians, and designers have attempted to do justice to this subject in public art and sculpture, and shows how national origin, ethnic allegiance, political ideology, and prevailing artistic style determined how memorials were commissioned and installed. His book also provides an analysis of the complex interrelationship between authentic historic sites, disparate and ephemeral representations of history, and the changing political and aesthetic balance between commemoration and escapism. In Fitting Memory includes 127 specially commissioned photographs by Ira Nowinski from seven European countries, the United States, and Israel. Nine additional photographs are by photographers from Italy, the Netherlands, and the United States. The riveting images provide the reader with a visual tour of these memorials. Along with an annotated bibliography, the volume also contains a comprehensive list of memorials in Europe, the United States, and Israel. An essential tool for those interested in visiting the memorial sites, the book also provides a critical analysis for serious researchers.  
Author: Sybil Milton
ISBN: 9780814343760
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Independent Man: The Life and Times of Senator James Couzens Image
Independent Man: The Life and Times of Senator James Couzens
First published in 1958 by Charles Scribner’s Sons, Independent Man is the only book-length biography of one of Michigan’s most remarkable men. His many careers embraced both the business and political spheres. Couzens was a prominent businessman who helped shape Ford Motor Company, but he left the company when he and Henry Ford clashed over politics. Upon leaving Ford, Couzens began his political career, first serving as Detroit’s police commissioner. He went on to a controversial term as mayor of Detroit and then represented Michigan in the U.S. Senate. This book reveals the life of a truly unique and inspirational man.   
Author: Harry Barnard
ISBN: 9780814335871
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Jewish Agricultural Utopias in America, 1880-1910 Image
Jewish Agricultural Utopias in America, 1880-1910
Brook Farm, Oneida, Amana, and Nauvoo are familiar names in American history. Far less familiar are New Odessa, Bethlehem-Jehudah, Cotopaxi, and Alliance—the Brook Farms and Oneidas of the Jewish people in North America. The wealthy, westernized leaders of late nineteenth-century American Jewry and a member of the immigrating Russian Jews shared an eagerness to “repeal” the lengthy socioeconomic history in which European Jews were confined to petty commerce and denied agricultural experience. A small group of immigrant Jews chose to ignore urbanization and industrialization, defy the depression afflicting agriculture in the late 1800s, and devote themselves to experiments in collective farming in America. Some of these idealists were pious; others were agnostics or atheists. Some had the support of American and West European philanthropists; others were willing to go it alone. But in the farming colonies they founded in Oregon, Colorado, the Dakotas, Michigan, Louisiana, Arkansas, Virginia, and New Jersey, among other places, they were sublimely indifferent to the need for careful planning and thus had limited success. Only in New Jersey, close to markets and supporters in New York and Philadelphia, were colonization efforts combined with agro-industrial enterprises; consequently, these colonies were able to survive for as long as one generation.   
Author: Uri D. Herscher
ISBN: 9780814344644
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Jewish Buenos Aires, 1890- 1939: In Search of an Identity Image
Jewish Buenos Aires, 1890- 1939: In Search of an Identity
Victor Mirelman, in his study of the greatest concentration of Latin American Jewry, examines the changing facade of the Argentinean Jewish community from the beginning of mass Jewish immigration in 1890 to its decline in 1930. During this period, Jews arrived from Russia, Poland, Romania, Syria, Turkey and Morocco Each group founded its own synagogues. mutual help organizations. hospitals. cultural associations. and newspapers of particular vitality was the Yiddish press and the Yiddish theatre. Jewish immigrants were also especially active politically. particularly in the Socialist Party and in the workers’ unions. Based on research in the Argentine archives. Jewish Buenos Aires, 1890-1930 describes the immigration and settlement process. studies the first generation of Argentine-born Jews. and provides an understanding of assimilation and acculturation. Mirelman discusses the religious life of the community differentiating between the Ashkenazim and the various Sephardic groups and devotes chapters to Zionism, to Jewish culture in Yiddish. Hebrew. and Spanish. to education; and to social action Issues that created conflict and friction are analyzed in detail.  
Author: Victor A. Mirelman
ISBN: 9780814344569
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880-1939: Jewish Landsmanshaftn in American Culture Image
Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880-1939: Jewish Landsmanshaftn in American Culture
Landsmanshaftn, associations of immigrants from the same hometown, became the most popular form of organization among Eastern European Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880–1939, by Daniel Soyer, holds an in-depth discussion on the importance of these hometown societies that provided members with valuable material benefits and served as arenas for formal and informal social interaction. In addition to discussing both continuity and transformation as features of the immigrant experience, this approach recognizes that ethnic identity is a socially constructed and malleable phenomenon. Soyer explores this process of construction by raising more specific questions about what immigrants themselves have meant by Americanization and how their hometown associations played an important part in the process.  
Author: Daniel Soyer
ISBN: 9780814344514
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives from Israel Image
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives from Israel
Jewish Moroccan Folk Narratives focuses on two central elements: textual research to examine the aesthetic qualities of the narrative, their division into genres, the various versions and their parallels, and acculturation in Israel, as well as contextual research to examine the performance art of the narrator and the role of the narrative as a communicative process in the narrating society. The collection includes twenty-one narratives by twelve storytellers; an account of the narrators’ lives and a commentary have been applied to each. In contrast to most anthologies of Jewish folktales, the texts in this book were recorded in the natural context of narration and in the language of origin (Judaeo-Arabic), meeting the most vigorous standards of current folklore scholarship.  
Author: Haya Bar-Itzhak and Aliza Shenhar
ISBN: 9780814344538
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Jewish Poland - Legends of Origin: Ethnopoetics and Legendary Chronicles Image
Jewish Poland - Legends of Origin: Ethnopoetics and Legendary Chronicles
The first appearance of Jews in Poland and their adventures during their early years of settlement in the country are concealed in undocumented shadows of history. What survived are legends of origin that early chroniclers, historians, writers, and folklore scholars transcribed, thus contributing to their preservation. According to the legendary chronicles Jews resided in Poland for a millennium and developed a vibrant community. Haya Bar-Itzhak examines the legends of origin of the Jews of Poland and discloses how the community creates its own chronicle, how it structures and consolidates its identity through stories about its founding, and how this identity varies from age to age. Bar-Itzhak also examines what happened to these legends after the extermination of Polish Jewry during the Holocaust, when the human space they describe no longer exists except in memory. For the Polish Jews after the Holocaust, the legends of origin undergo a fascinating transformation into legends of destruction. Jewish Poland—Legends of Origin brings to light the more obscure legends of origin as well as those already well known. This book will be of interest to scholars in folklore studies as well as to scholars of Judaic history and culture.   
Author: Haya Bar-Itzhak
ISBN: 9780814343920
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
John Jacob Astor: Business and Finance in the Early Republic Image
John Jacob Astor: Business and Finance in the Early Republic
John Jacob Astor was the best-known and most important American businessman for more than a half-century. His career encompassed the country’s formative economic years from the precarious days following the American Revolution to the emergence of an urban-centered manufacturing economy in the late 1840s. Change was the dominant motif of the period, and Astor either exemplified the varied economic, social, and political changes in his business career or he directly affected the course of events. In this biography of John Jacob Astor, John Denis Haeger uses Astor’s life and his career as a merchant, fur trader, and land speculator as vehicles for examining several important themes and issues in American economic and urban development between 1790 and 1860. Haeger addresses, in fascinating detail, the complexity of Astor’s business endeavors, his extensive connections with the country’s dominant political figures, and the “modern” business strategies and managerial techniques that he used to build his business empire. Astor was clearly not a business revolutionary who radically altered an existing system. He was, however, an entrepreneur who exerted a profound change on an industry. He fascinated his contemporaries precisely because he so mirrored his age and its changing business and economic patterns. He grasped the greater size and complexity of an emerging commercial economy in post-Revolutionary America and adopted strategies and structures that transformed the fur and China trades. His investment in city real estate, stocks, bonds, and even a western city made him part of America’s evolution into an urbanindustrial society. For his era, John Astor’s career was remarkable for its modernity, vision, and reflection of American economic and political values. More than just a personal biography, John Jacob Astor combines economic theories with a fascinating narrative that demonstrates, like no other book has, Astor’s impact on the early republic.  
Author: John Denis Haeger
ISBN: 9780814343432
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Marketing Identities: The Invention of Jewish Ethnicity in Ost und West Image
Marketing Identities: The Invention of Jewish Ethnicity in Ost und West
Marketing Identities analyzes how Ost und West (East and West), the first Jewish magazine (1901-1923) published in Berlin by westernized Jews originally from Eastern Europe, promoted ethnic identity to Jewish audiences in Germany and throughout the world. Using sophisticated techniques of modern marketing, such as stereotyping, the editors of this highly successful journal attempted to forge a minority consciousness. Marketing Identities is thus about the beginnings of “ethnicity” as we know it in the late twentieth century. An interdisciplinary study, Marketing Identities illuminates present-day discussions in Europe and the Americas regarding the experience and self-understanding of minority groups and combines media and cultural studies with German and Jewish history.   
Author: David A. Brenner
ISBN: 9780814345184
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Maurice Sugar: Law, Labor, and the Left in Detroit, 1912-1950 Image
Maurice Sugar: Law, Labor, and the Left in Detroit, 1912-1950
It was Maurice Sugar, labor activist and lawyer for the United Auto Workers, who played a key role in guiding the newly-formed union through the treacherous legal terrain obstructing its development in the 1930s. He orchestrated the injunction hearings on the Dodge Main strike and defended the legality of the sit-down tactic. As the UAW’s General Council, he wrote the union’s constitution in 1939, a model of democratic thinking. Sugar worked with George Addes, UAW Secretary-Treasurer, to nurture rank-and-file power. A founder of the National Lawyers’ Guild, Sugar also served as a member of Detroit’s Common Council at the head of a UAW “labor” ticket. By 1947, Sugar was embroiled in a struggle within the UAW that he feared would destroy the open structures he had helped to build. He found himself in opposition to Walter Reuther’s bid to run the union. A long-time socialist, Sugar fell victim to mounting Cold War hysteria. When Reuther assumed control of the UAW, Sugar was summarily dismissed. Christopher Johnson chronicles the life of Maurice Sugar, from his roots in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, through his resistance with Eugene V. Debs to World War I, and on to the struggles of the early 1930s to bring the union message to Detroit. Firmly grounded on the historiography of the UAW, Johnson shows the importance of Sugar and the Left in laying the foundation for unionizing the auto industry in the pre-UAW days. He documents the work of the Left in building a Black-labor coalition in Detroit, the importance of anti-Communism in Reuther’s rise to power, and the diminution of union democracy in the UAW brought about by the Cold War. Maurice Sugar represents a force in American life that bears recalling in these barren years of plant closings.   
Author: Christopher H. Johnson
ISBN: 9780814340042
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Medieval Jewish Seals from Europe Image
Medieval Jewish Seals from Europe
Friedenberg’s work provides the first comprehensive study of the use of seals by Jews from the 12th to the 16th century and their role in transforming Europe from a barter economy to a money economy. Structuring his analysis by geographic regions, Friedenberg examines the physical nature of the seals and discusses the symbols and legends they employ. He examines their relation to similar Christian seals, their legal validity and use, and their prevalence in certain areas at certain times. In all, 177 seals are catalogued. Where the impressions are appended to documents, the document is also reviewed. Whenever possible, the seals are illustrated, as are the most significant documents, along with other seals, medals, coins, letters and paintings which serve to illuminate the discussion of a seal. The result is the definitive catalog of all known Jewish seals of the period.
Author: Daniel M. Friedenberg
ISBN: 9780814344859
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Nazism, The Jews and American Zionism, 1933-1948 Image
Nazism, The Jews and American Zionism, 1933-1948
Aaron Berman takes a moderate and measured approach to one of the most emotional issues in American Jewish historiography, namely, the response of American Jews to Nazism and the extermination of European Jewry.In remarkably large numbers, American Jews joined the Zionist crusade to create a Jewish state that would finally end the problem of Jewish homelessness, which they believed was the basic cause not only of the Holocaust but of all anti-Semitism. Though American Zionists could justly claim credit for the successful establishment of Israel in 1948, this triumph was not without cost. Their insistence on including a demand for Jewish statehood in any proposal to aid European Jewry politicized the rescue issue and made it impossible to appeal for American aid on purely humanitarian grounds. The American Zionist response to Nazism also shaped he political turmoil in the Middle East which followed Israel’s creation. Concerned primarily with providing a home for Jewish refugees and fearing British betrayal, Zionists could not understand Arab protests in defense of their own national interests. Instead they responded to the Arab revolt with armed force and sought to insure their own claim to Palestine, Zionists came to link he Arabs with the Nazi and British forces that were opposed to the establishment of a Jewish state. In the thinking of American Zionists, the Arabs were steadily transformed from a people with whom an accommodation would have to be made into a mortal enemy to be defeated. Aaron Berman does not apologize for American Jews, but rather tries to understand the constraints within which they operated and what opportunities-if any-they had to respond to Hitler. In surveying the latest scholarship and responding o charges against American Jewry, Berman’s arguments are reasoned and reasonable.   
Author: Aaron Berman
ISBN: 9780814344033
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
No Haven for the Oppressed: United States Policy Toward Jewish Refugees, 1938-1945 Image
No Haven for the Oppressed: United States Policy Toward Jewish Refugees, 1938-1945
No Haven for the Oppressed is the most thorough and the most comprehensive analysis to be written to date on the United States policy toward Jewish refugees during World War II. Friedman draws upon many sources for his history, significantly upon papers which have only recently been opened to public scrutiny. These include State Department Records at the National Archives and papers relating to the Jewish refugee question at the Roosevelt Library at Hyde Park. Such documents serve as the foundation for this study, together with the papers of the American Friends Service Committee, of Rabbis Stephen Wise and Abba Silver, Senator Robert Wagner, Secretary Hull and Assistant Secretary of State Breckinridge Long, of the American Jewish Archives, the National Jewish Archives, and extensive interviews with persons intimately involved in the refugee question. Professor Friedman describes America’s pre-war preoccupation with economic woes: immigrants, particularly Jewish immigrants, were viewed as competitors for scarce jobs. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, although personally sympathetic to the dilemma of Jews, was not willing to risk public and congressional support for his domestic programs by championing legislation or diplomacy to increase Jewish immigration. The court-packing scandal and the unsuccessful purge of Southern Democrats had left his popularity at an all-time low. Jewish leaders were equally unwilling to antagonize the American public by strong advocacy of the Jewish cause. They feared anti-Semitic backlash against American Jews and worried that their own “100 percent” loyalty to the nation might be questioned. Although he takes issue with authors who propose that anti-Semitism at the highest levels of the State Department was the major block to the rescue of the Jews, Friedman demonstrates that some officials continually thwarted rescue plans. He suggests that a disinclination to sully themselves in negotiations with the Nazis and a fear that any ransom would prolong the global conflict, caused the Allies to offer only token overtures to the Nazis on behalf of the Jews.  
Author: Saul S. Friedman
ISBN: 9780814343746
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
On Jewish Folklore Image
On Jewish Folklore
On Jewish Folklore spans a half-century of scholarly inquiry by the noted anthropologist and biblical scholar Raphael Patai. He essays collected in this volume, some of which are presented for the first time in English translation, provide a rich harvest of Jewish customs and traditional beliefs, gathered from all over the world and from ancient to modern times. Among the subjects Dr. Patai investigated and recorded are the history and oral traditions of the now-vanished Marrano community of Meshhed, Iran; cultural change among the so-called Jewish Indians of Mexico; beliefs and customs in connection with birth, the rainbow, and the color blue; Jewish variants of the widespread custom of earth-eating; and the remarkable parallels between the rituals connected with enthroning a new king as described in the Bible and as practiced among certain African tribes.  
Author: Raphael Patai
ISBN: 9780814344200
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Prayer & Community: The Havurah in American Judaism Image
Prayer & Community: The Havurah in American Judaism
Riv-Ellen Prell spent eighteen months of participant observation field research studying a countercultural havurah to determine why these groups emerged in the United States during the 1970s. In her book, she explores the central questions posed by the early havurot and their founders. She also examines the havurah as a development of American Judaism, continuing—rather than rejecting—many of the previous generations’ ideas about religion. Combining history and ethnography, Prell uses current theories about ritual and prayer to understand men’s and women’s struggles with their religious tradition and their desire to create community.  
Author: Riv-Ellen Prell
ISBN: 9780814344477
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Queen of the Lakes Image
Queen of the Lakes
This book is an account of the ships that have borne the name “Queen of the Lakes,” an honorary title indicating that, at the time of its launching, a ship is the longest on the Great Lakes. In one of the most comprehensive books ever written on the maritime history of the lakes, Mark L. Thompson presents a vignette of each of the dozens of ships that have held the title, chronicling the dates the ship sailed, its dimensions, the derivation of its name, its role in the economic development of the region, and its sailing history. Through the stories of the individual ships, Thompson also describes the growth of ship design on the Great Lakes and the changing nature of the shipping industry on the lakes. The launching of the first ship on Lake Ontario in 1678 – the diminutive Frontenac, a small, two-masted vessel of only about ten tons and no more than forty or forty-five feet long – set in motion an evolutionary process that has continued for more than three hundred years. That ship is the direct ancestor of all the ships that ever have operated on the Great Lakes, from the Str. Onoko, launched in 1882 and the first ship to bear the name Queen of the Lakes; to the Str. W. D. Rees, which held its title for only a few weeks, to today’s Queen, the Tregurtha, the longest ship on the lakes since its launching in 1981. Although ships on the Great Lakes may be surpassed in size and efficiency by many of the modern ocean freighters, Thompson notes that the ships now sailing on the great freshwater seas of North America have achieved a level of operating mastery that is unrivaled anywhere else in the world, considering the inherent limitations of the Great Lakes system. The Tregurtha reigns as a model of unsurpassed maritime craftsmanship and as heir to a long and glorious tradition of excellence. Every magnificent ship that has borne the title in the past has contributed in some part to the greatness embodied in the Tregurtha. In time, her title as Queen of the Lakes will pass to another monumental freighter that will carry the art and science of shipbuilding and operation to even greater heights.   
Author: Mark L. Thompson
ISBN: 9780814343371
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Rabbinic Judaism in the Making: The Halakhah from Ezra to Judah I Image
Rabbinic Judaism in the Making: The Halakhah from Ezra to Judah I
Through the ages, theology in Judaism has played roles of varying importance. But the role of theology is minor compared with that of law and observance. This book is devoted to a study of the evolution of normative Judaism from the time of Ezra (ca. 400 B.C.) to Judah I, the Prince (ca. 200 A.D.). Its focus on law represents a realistic approach to the history of applied Judaism. Rabbinic Judaism in the Making is the first study in English to trace the evolution of Rabbinic Law and Rabbinic Judaism. A concise history of post-biblical normative Judaism in antiquity, Mr. Guttmann’s book concentrates on the crucial inter-testamental period, and should be valuable to students of ancient history, those interested in the history of the inter-testamental period, and both Christian and Jewish theologians, ministers, and rabbis.  
Author: Alexander Guttmann
ISBN: 9780814344019
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Seasons of Grace: A History of the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit Image
Seasons of Grace: A History of the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit
Seasons of Grace is a history of the Catholic Church and community in southern lower Michigan from the 1830s through the 1950s. More than a chronicle of clerical successions and institutional expansion, the book also examines those social and cultural influences that affected the development of the Catholic community. To document the course of institutional growth in the diocese, Tentler devotes a portion of the book to tracing the evolution of administrative structures at the Chancery and the founding of parishes, parochial schools, and social welfare organizations. Substantial attention is also given to the social history of the Catholic community, reflected in changes in religious practice, parish life and governance, and the role of women in church organizations and in devotional activities. Tentler also discusses the issue of Catholics in state and local politics and Catholic practice with regard to abortion, contraception, and intermarriage.  
Author: Leslie Woodcock Tentler
ISBN: 9780814343999
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Songquest: The Journals of Great Lakes Folklorist Ivan H. Walton Image
Songquest: The Journals of Great Lakes Folklorist Ivan H. Walton
Ivan H. Walton was a pioneering folklorist who collected the songs and stories of aging sailors living along the shores of the Great Lakes in the 1930s. His collection is unique in the annals of Great Lakes folklore. It began as a search for songs but broadened into a collection of weather signs, shipboard beliefs, greenhorn tales, and stories of the intense rivalry between sailors and the steamboat men who replaced them. Edited by Joe Grimm, Songquest: The Journals of Great Lakes Folklorist Ivan H. Walton is a selection from the daily journals Walton wrote during his travels as a folklore collector. It is clear that Walton, a professor of English at the University of Michigan, both admired the sailors of the Great Lakes for what they had done during their working years and worried about them as they entered the twilight of their lives. Walton went beyond the songs he set out to find and captured the pitch and roll of the Great Lakes alive with white-winged schooners. His writings provide a clear picture of the colorful individuals he met and interviewed—captains, cabin boys, tugmen, chandlers, boardinghouse owners, dredgers, and light keepers. Walton also documented the methods he used and recorded his personal thoughts about his nomadic life and the events going on around him during the 1930s, including the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s election, and the end of Prohibition.  
Author: Joe Grimm, Ivan H. Walton
ISBN: 9780814344606
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Steamboats and Sailors of the Great Lakes Image
Steamboats and Sailors of the Great Lakes
The Great Lakes shipping industry can trace its lineage to 1679 with the launching on Lake Erie of the Griffon, a sixty-foot galley weighing nearly fifty tons. Built by LaSalle, a French explorer who had been commissioned to search for a passage through North America to China, it was the first sailing ship to operate on the upper lakes, signaling the dawn of the Great Lakes shipping industry as we know it today. Steamboats and Sailors of the Great Lakes is the most thorough and factual study of the Great Lakes shipping industry written this century. Author Mark L. Thompson tells the fascinating story of the world’s most efficient bulk transportation system, describing the Great Lakes freighters, the cargoes of the great ships ,and the men and women who have served as crew. He documents the dramatic changes that have taken places in the industry and looks at the critical role that Great Lakes shipping plays in the economic well-being of the U.S. and Canada, despite the fact tat the size of the fleet and the amount of cargo carried have declined dramatically in recent years. Spanning more than three centuries, from LaSalle’s voyage in 1679, through 1975 with the mysterious sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald, to life aboard today’s thousand-foot behemoths, this important volume documents the evolution of the industry through its “Golden Age” at the end of the nineteenth century to the present, with a downsized U.S. fleet that numbers fewer than seventy vessels.   
Author: Mark L. Thompson
ISBN: 9780814338353
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Survival and Regeneration: Detroit’s American Indian Community Image
Survival and Regeneration: Detroit’s American Indian Community
Survival and Regeneration captures the heritage of Detroit’s colorful Indian community through printed sources and the personal life stories of many Native Americans. During a ten-year period, Edmund Jefferson Danziger, Jr. interviewed hundreds of Indians about their past and their needs and aspirations for the future. This history is essentially their success story. In search of new opportunities, a growing number of rural Indians journeyed to Detroit after World War II. Destitute reservations had sapped their physical and cultural strength; paternalistic bureaucrats undermined their self-respect and confidence; and despairing tribal members too often sound solace in mind-numbing alcohol. Cut off from the Bureau of Indian Affairs services, many newcomers had difficulty establishing themselves successfully in the city and experienced feelings of insecurity and powerlessness. By 1970, they were one of the Motor City’s most “invisible” minority groups, so mobile and dispersed throughout the metropolitan area that not even the Indian organizations knew where they all lived. To grasp the nature of their remarkable regeneration, this inspiring volume examines the historic challenges that Native American migrants to Detroit faced – adjusting to urban life, finding a good job and a decent place to live, securing quality medical care, educating their children, and maintaining their unique cultural heritage. Danziger scrutinizes the leadership that emerged within the Indian community and the formal native organizations through which the Indian community’s wide-ranging needs have been met. He also highlights the significant progress enjoyed by Detroit Indians – improved housing, higher educational achievement, less unemployment, and greater average family incomes – that has resulted from their persistence and self-determination. Historically, the Motor City has provided an environment where lives could be refashioned amid abundant opportunities. Indians have not been totally assimilated, nor have they forsaken Detroit en masse for their former homelands. Instead, they have forged vibrant lives for themselves as Indian-Detroiters. They are not as numerous or politically powerful as their black neighbors, but the story of these native peoples leaves no doubt about their importance to Detroit and of the city’s effect on them.   
Author: Edmund Jefferson Danziger, Jr.
ISBN: 9780814343333
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Forerunners: Dutch Jewry in the North American Diaspora Image
The Forerunners: Dutch Jewry in the North American Diaspora
Between 1800 and 1880 approximately 6500 Dutch Jews immigrated to the United States to join the hundreds who had come during the colonial era. Although they numbered less than one-tenth of all Dutch immigrants and were a mere fraction of all Jews in America, the Dutch Jews helped build American Jewry and did so with a nationalistic flair. Like the other Dutch immigrant group, the Jews demonstrated the salience of national identity and the strong forces of ethnic, religious, and cultural institutions. They immigrated in family migration chains, brought special job skills and religious traditions, and founded at least three ethnic synagogues led by Dutch rabbis. The Forerunners offers the first detailed history of the immigration of Dutch Jews to the United States and to the whole American diaspora. Robert Swierenga describes the life of Jews in Holland during the Napoleonic era and examines the factors that caused them to emigrate, first to the major eastern seaboard cities of the United States, then to the frontier cities of the Midwest, and finally to San Francisco. He provides a detailed look at life among the Dutch Jews in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New Orleans. This is a significant volume for readers interested in Jewish history, religious history, and comparative studies of religious declension. Immigrant and social historians likewise will be interested in this look at a religious minority group that was forced to change in the American environment.  
Author: Robert P. Swierenga
ISBN: 9780814344163
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Iron Hunter Image
The Iron Hunter
Originally published in 1919, The Iron Hunter is the autobiography of one of Michigan’s most influential and flamboyant historical figures: the reporter, publisher, explorer, politician, and twenty-seventh governor of Michigan, Chase Salmon Osborn (1860-1949). Making unprecedented use of the automobile in his 1910 campaign, Osborn ran a memorable campaign that was followed by an even more remarkable term as governor. In two years he eliminated Michigan’s deficit, ended corruption, and produced the state’s first workmen’s compensation law and a reform of the electoral process. His autobiography reflects the energy and enthusiasm of a reformer inspired by the Progressive Movement, but it also reveals the poetic spirit of an adventurer who fell in love with Michigan’s Upper Peninsula after traveling the world.   
Author: Chase S. Osborn
ISBN: 9780814335857
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Israeli-American Connection: Its Roots in the Yishuv, 1914-1945 Image
The Israeli-American Connection: Its Roots in the Yishuv, 1914-1945
The Israeli-American Connection examines the ways in which the American experience influenced some of the major leaders of the yishuv, the Jewish settlement in Palestine, during and between the world wars. In six biographical chapters, Michael Brown studies Vladimir Jabotinsky, Chaim Nahman Bialik, Berl Katznelson, Henrietta Szold, Golda Meir, and David Ben-Gurian, focusing on each leader’s involvement with and image of America, as well as the impact of America on their lives and careers.  
Author: Michael Brown
ISBN: 9780814344583
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume 1: “A Touch of Wildness” Image
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume 1: “A Touch of Wildness”
An imposing literary figure in America and Europe during the first half of the twentieth century, Ludwig Lewisohn (1882-1955) struggled with feelings of alienation in Christian America that were gradually resolved by his developing Jewish identity, a process reflected in hundreds of works of fiction, literary analysis, and social criticism. Born in Berlin, Lewisohn moved with his family in 1890 to South Carolina. Identified by others as a Jew, he remained an outsider throughout his youth. Lewisohn became a notable scholar and translator of German and French literature, teaching at Wisconsin and Ohio State. Following his mother’s death in 1914, he began to explore the Jewish life he had rejected, and by 1920 became a Zionist committed to fighting assimilation. Accusatory and inflammatory, his memoir Up Stream (1922) struck at the very heart of American culture and society, and caused great controversy and lasting enmity. As strong emotional influences, the women in Lewisohn’s life—his mother and four wives—helped to frame his life and work. Believing himself liberated by the woman he declared his “spiritual wife” while legally married to another, he proclaimed the artist’s right to freedom in The Creative Life (1924), abandoned his editorship at The Nation, and fled to Europe. Lewisohn’s fictionalized account of his failed marriage, The Case of Mr. Crump (1926), once again attacked the empty morality of this world and won Sigmund Freud’s praise as the greatest psychological novel of the century. A creator of one of Paris’s leading salons, Lewisohn ended his leisurely writer’s life in 1934 to awaken America to the growing Nazi threat. Poised to face the unfinished marital battle at home, but anxious to engage in the coming struggle for Jewish survival and the future of Western civilization, he set sail, unsure of what lay ahead.  
Author: Ralph Melnick
ISBN: 9780814344668
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume II: This Dark and Desperate Age Image
The Life and Work of Ludwig Lewisohn, Volume II: This Dark and Desperate Age
An imposing literary figure in America and Europe during the first half of the twentieth century, Ludwig Lewisohn (1882–1955) struggled with feelings of alienation in Christian America that were gradually resolved by his developing Jewish identity, a process reflected in hundreds of works of fiction, literary analysis, and social criticism. This second volume portrays Lewisohn’s last decades as an outspoken opponent of Nazi Germany, a leading promoter of Jewish resettlement in Palestine, a member of Brandeis University’s first faculty, and one of the earliest voices advocating Jewish renewal in America. Despite his activism, Lewisohn was no longer welcome in Zionist circles by 1948 as a result of his “unacceptable” opinions concerning British intransigence, organizational politics, and, particularly, Jewish cultural and religious decline. However, the invitation to join the newly established Brandeis University as its only full professor provided him with the opportunity he sought to contribute to the reshaping of American Jewry. Lewisohn’s efforts would later bear fruit in the Jewish renewal movement of the next generation.   
Author: Ralph Melnick
ISBN: 9780814345030
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer: Romance and Reform in Victorian England Image
The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer: Romance and Reform in Victorian England
Between 1830 and 1880, the Jewish community flourished in England. During this time, known as haskalah, or the Anglo-Jewish Enlightenment, Jewish women in England became the first Jewish women anywhere to publish novels, histories, periodicals, theological tracts, and conduct manuals. The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer analyzes this critical but forgotten period in the development of Jewish women’s writing in relation to Victorian literary history, women’s cultural history, and Jewish cultural history. Michael Galchinsky demonstrates that these women writers were the most widely recognized spokespersons for the haskalah. Their romances, some of which sold as well as novels by Dickens, argued for Jew’s emancipation in the Victorian world and women’s emancipation in the Jewish world.   
Author: Michael Galchinsky
ISBN: 9780814344453
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Shaping of Jewish Identity in Nineteenth Century France Image
The Shaping of Jewish Identity in Nineteenth Century France
Nineteenth-century French Jewry was a community struggling to meet the challenges of emancipation and modernity. This struggle, with its origins in the founding of the French nation, constitutes the core of modern Jewish identity. With the Revolution of 1789 came the collapse of the social, political, and philosophical foundations of exclusiveness, forcing French society and the Jews to come to terms with the meaning of emancipation. Over time, the enormous challenge that emancipation posed for traditional Jewish beliefs became evident. In the 1830s, a more comprehensive ideology of regeneration emerged through the efforts of younger Jewish scholars and intellectuals. A response to the social and religious implications of emancipation, it was characterized by the demand for the elimination of rituals that violated the French conceptions of civilization and social integration; a drive for greater administrative centralization; and the quest for inter-communal and ethnic unity. In its various elements, regeneration formed a distinct ideology of emancipation that was designed to mediate Jewish interaction with French society and culture. Jay Berkovitz reveals the complexities inherent in the processes of emancipation and modernization, focusing on the efforts of French Jewish leaders to come to terms with the social and religious implications of modernity. All in all, his emphasis on the intellectual history of French Jewry provides a new perspective on a significant chapter of Jewish history.  
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
ISBN: 9780814344071
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
The Troubled Origins of the Italian Catholic Labor Movement, 1878–1914 Image
The Troubled Origins of the Italian Catholic Labor Movement, 1878–1914
In his book, Sándor Agócs explores the conflicts that accompanied the emergence of the Italian Catholic labor movement. He examines the ideologies that were at work and details the organizational forms they inspired. During the formative years of the Italian labor movement, Neo-Thomism became the official ideology of the church. Church leadership drew upon the central Thomistic principal of caritas, Christian love, in its response to the social climate in Italy, which had become increasingly charged with class consciousness and conflict. Aquinas’s principles ruled out class struggle as contrary to the spirit of Christianity and called for a symbiotic relationship among the various social strata. Neo-Thomistic philosophy also emphasized the social functions of property, a principle that demanded the paternalistic care and tutelage of the interests of working people by the wealthy. In applying these principles to the nascent labor movement, the church’s leadership called for a mixed union (misto), whose membership would include both capitalists and workers. They argued that this type of union best reflected the tenets of Neo-Thomistic social philosophy. In addition, through its insistence on the misto, the church was also motivated by an obsessive concern with socialism, which it viewed as a threat, and by a fear of the working classes, which it associated with socialism, which it viewed as a threat, and by a fear of the working classes, which it associated with socialism. In pressing for the mixed union, therefore, the church leadership hoped not only to realize Neo-Thomistic principles, but also to defuse class struggle and prevent the proletariat from becoming a viable social and political force. Catholic activists, who were called upon to put ideas into practice and confronted social realities daily, learned that the “mixed” unions were a utopian vision that could not be realized. They knew that the age of paternalism was over and that neither the workers not the capitalists were interested in the mixed union. In its stead, the activists urged for the “simple” union, an organization for workers only. The conflict which ensued pitted the bourgeoisie and the Catholic hierarchy against the young activists. Sándor Agócs reveals precisely in what way Catholic social thought was inadequate to deal with the realities of unionization and why Catholics were unable to present a reasonable alternative.  
Author: Sándor Agócs
ISBN: 9780814343319
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Toast of the Town: The Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson Image
Toast of the Town: The Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson
As part of the great migration of southern blacks to the north, Sunnie Wilson came to Detroit from South Carolina after graduating from college, and soon became a pillar of the local music industry. He started out as a song and dance performer but found his niche as a local promoter of boxing, which allowed him to make friends and business connections quickly in the thriving industrial city of Detroit. Part oral history, memoir, and biography, Toast of the Town draws from hundreds of hours of taped conversations between Sunnie Wilson and John Cohassey, as Wilson reflected on the changes in Detroit over the last sixty years. Supported by extensive research, Wilson’s reminiscences are complemented by photographs from his own collection, which capture the spirit of the times. Through Sunnie Wilson’s narrative, Detroit’s glory comes alive, bringing back nights at the hopping Forest Club on Hastings Street, which hosted music greats like Nat King Cole and boasted the longest bar in Michigan, and sunny afternoons at Lake Idlewild, the largest black resort in the United States that attracted thousands every weekend from all over the Midwest. An influential insider’s perspective, Toast of the Town fills a void in the documented history of Detroit’s black and entertainment community from the 1920s to the present.  
Author: Sunnie Wilson with John Cohassey
ISBN: 9780814343883
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Tradition and Politics: The Religious Parties of Israel Image
Tradition and Politics: The Religious Parties of Israel
Tradition and Politics is acomprehensive study of the religious parties of Israel. Gary S. Schiff traces the religious parties of the modern state of Israel from their origins in Europe early in the twentieth century to, in response and reaction to the rise of Zionism, their transplantation to Palestine, their adaptation to the new realities, their participation in the quazi-government of the Jewish community under the British mandate, and their unfolding roles after independence. Schiff examines a subject that has long fascinated and perplexed observers of the Israeli scene: the existence of four separate and distinct religious political parties within the Israeli political spectrum. Each party claims to be the one exponent of traditional Judaism; each demonstrates a distinctive political personality based on its historical development and ideological perspective.Religious (traditionalist) parties emerge in reaction to the pressures and predicaments of modernization and help to legitimize modernizing states in the eyes of traditional sectors of the public. Schiff finds the key to the uniqueness of the Israeli parties to be their divergent attitudes toward the relationship between tradition and modernity. After the labyrinthine histories of Israel’s religious parties in both pre-state and post-independent eras, Schiff turns his attention to several key religious and state institutions: the Ministry of Religions, the chief rabbinate, and the separate religious school systems, and to some of the controversial issues that have racked Israeli society—for example, the question of “Who is a Jew?” and the controversy over Sabbath legislation. He concludes with an analysis of the special significance of the religious parties in the Israeli political system.  
Author: Gary S. Schiff
ISBN: 9780814343906
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Twenty Israeli Composers Image
Twenty Israeli Composers
Israel’s contemporary art music reflects a modern society that is an intricate fabric of national and ethnic origins, languages and dialects, customs and traditions—a heterogeneous culture of cultures. It is a rich and distinctive environment—at once ancient and modern, spiritual and secular, traditional and progressive. Twenty Israeli Composers, the first published collection of interviews with Israeli composers, explores this developing and distinctive music culture. The featured composers have earned distinction in Israel and abroad, and reflect the pluralism of Israeli art music, culture, and society. In first-person narrative, they discuss the interaction of inspiration, method, and cultural context in their work, revealing both international and national influence and scope. Three generations of contemporary composers-immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe, North and South America, and naïve sabras- share their ideas about music, the creative process, and their experiences as artists living and working in Israel. Robert Fleisher furnishes a biographical sketch of each composer, followed by a summary of recent accomplishments. The book also includes a bibliography, discography, and information for further study.   
Author: Robert Fleisher
ISBN: 9780814344248
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 1 Image
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 1
In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776. Volume I focuses on the American revolution and the early national period, from 1776 to 1840. Marcus examines the role played by Jews in the revolution and discusses important historical and social themes such as politics, commerce, religion, Jewish and American culture, anti-Jewish prejudices, and the phenomenon of assimilation.   
Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
ISBN: 9780814344682
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 2, The Germanic Period Image
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 2, The Germanic Period
In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776. The second volume of this seminal work on American Jewry covers the period from 1841 to 1860. Unlike the early Jewish settlers, these immigrants were Ashkenazim from Europe’s Germanic countries. Marcus follows the movement of these “German” Jews into all regions west of the Hudson River.  
Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
ISBN: 9780814344705
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 3, The Germanic Period, Part 2 Image
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 3, The Germanic Period, Part 2
In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776. The third volume covers the period from 1860 to 1920, beginning with the Jews, slavery, and the Civil War, and concluding with the rise of Reform Judaism as well as the increasing spirit of secularization that characterized emancipated, prosperous, liberal Jewry before it was confronted by a rising tide of American anti-Semitism in the 1920s.   
Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
ISBN: 9780814344729
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 4, The East European Period, The Emergence of the American Jew Epilogue Image
United States Jewry, 1776-1985: Volume 4, The East European Period, The Emergence of the American Jew Epilogue
In United States Jewry, 1776–1985, the dean of American Jewish historians, Jacob Rader Marcus, unfolds the history of Jewish immigration, segregation, and integration; of Jewry’s cultural exclusiveness and assimilation; of its internal division and indivisible unity; and of its role in the making of America. Characterized by Marcus’s impeccable scholarship, meticulous documentation, and readable style, this landmark four-volume set completes the history Marcus began in The Colonial American Jew, 1492–1776. In the fourth and final volume of this set, Marcus deals with the coming and challenge of the East European Jews from 1852 to 1920. He explores settlement and colonization, dispersal to rural areas, life in large cities, the proletarians, the garment industry, the unions, and socialism. He also describes the life of the middle and upper class East European Jew. Special attention is paid to the growth of Zionism. In the epilogue, Marcus writes about the evolution of the “American Jew.”   
Author: Jacob Rader Marcus
ISBN: 9780814345054
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Uppermost Canada: The Western District and the Detroit Frontier, 1800-1850 Image
Uppermost Canada: The Western District and the Detroit Frontier, 1800-1850
Uppermost Canada examines the historical, cultural, and social history of the Canadian portion of the Detroit River community in the first half of the nineteenth century. The phrase “Uppermost Canada,” denoting the western frontier of Upper Canada (modern Ontario), was applied to the Canadian shore of the Detroit River during the War of 1812 by a British officer, who attributed it to President James Madison. The Western District was one of the partly-judicial, partly-governmental municipal units combining contradictory arisocratic and democratic traditions into which the province was divided until 1850. With its substantial French-Canadian population and its veneer of British officialdom, in close proximity to a newly American outpost, the Western District was potentially the most unstable. Despite all however, Alan Douglas demonstrates that the Western District endured without apparent change longer than any of the others.  
Author: R. Alan Douglas
ISBN: 9780814344491
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Without Bounds: The Life and Death of Rabbi Ya
Without Bounds: The Life and Death of Rabbi Ya'aqov Wazana
Without Bounds illuminates the life of the mysterious Rabbi Ya’aqov Wazana, a Jewish healer who worked in the Western High Atlas region in southern Morocco and died there in the early 1950s. Impressed by his healing powers and shamanic virtuosity, Moroccan Jews are intrigued by his lifestyle and contacts with the Muslim and the demonic worlds that dangerously blurred his Jewish identity. Based on interviews with Moroccan Jews conducted in the late 1980s, Without Bounds proposes multiple readings of Wazana’s life. Yoram Bilu re-creates the influences and important moments in Wazana’s life and evaluates his character from psychological and anthropological perspectives. Human- and demon-bound, holy and impure, Jew and Muslim, old and young, Rabbi Ya’aqov Wazana dissolved the boundaries of the major social categories in Morocco and integrated them into his identity.   
Author: Yoram Bilu
ISBN: 9780814343258
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Witness Through the Imagination: Jewish American Holocaust Literature Image
Witness Through the Imagination: Jewish American Holocaust Literature
Criticism of Holocaust literature is an emerging field of inquiry, and as might be expected, the most innovative work has been concentrated on the vanguard of European and Israeli Holocaust literature. Now that American fiction has amassed an impressive and provocative Holocaust canon, the time is propitious for its evaluation. Witness Through the Imagination presents a critical reading of themes and stylistic strategies of major American Holocaust fiction to determine its capacity to render the prelude, progress, and aftermath of the Holocaust. The unifying critical approach is the textual explication of themes and literary method, occasional comparative references to international Holocaust literature, and a discussion of extra-literary Holocaust sources that have influenced the creative writers’ treatment of the Holocaust universe.  
Author: S. Lillian Kremer
ISBN: 9780814343944
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
Working Detroit Image
Working Detroit
Babson recounts Detroit’s odyssey from a bulwark of the “open shop” to the nation’s foremost “union town.” Through words and pictures, Working Detroit documents the events in the city’s ongoing struggle to build an industrial society that is both prosperous and humane. Babson begins his account in 1848 when Detroit has just entered the industrial era. He weaves the broader historical realties, such as Red Scare, World War, and economic depression into his account, tracing the ebb and flow of the working class activity and organization in Detroit — from the rise of the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor in the 19th century, through the Congress of Industrial Organizations and the sitdown strike of the 1930s, to the civil rights and women’s movements of the 1960s and 1970s. The book concludes with an examination of the present day crisis facing the labor movement.
Author: Steve Babson with Ron Alpern, Dave Elsila, and John Revitte
ISBN: 9780814345092
Binding: E-Book
Format: EPUB
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